art-seen:

Alfons Mucha | Slovanská epopej (The Slav Epic) | 1910-1928
seen at Veletržní Palác, Prague

I visited Prague for a week when I was a much younger man. That I was unable to view The Slav Epic within the National Gallery is a great regret of mine. art-seen:

Alfons Mucha | Slovanská epopej (The Slav Epic) | 1910-1928
seen at Veletržní Palác, Prague

I visited Prague for a week when I was a much younger man. That I was unable to view The Slav Epic within the National Gallery is a great regret of mine. art-seen:

Alfons Mucha | Slovanská epopej (The Slav Epic) | 1910-1928
seen at Veletržní Palác, Prague

I visited Prague for a week when I was a much younger man. That I was unable to view The Slav Epic within the National Gallery is a great regret of mine. art-seen:

Alfons Mucha | Slovanská epopej (The Slav Epic) | 1910-1928
seen at Veletržní Palác, Prague

I visited Prague for a week when I was a much younger man. That I was unable to view The Slav Epic within the National Gallery is a great regret of mine. art-seen:

Alfons Mucha | Slovanská epopej (The Slav Epic) | 1910-1928
seen at Veletržní Palác, Prague

I visited Prague for a week when I was a much younger man. That I was unable to view The Slav Epic within the National Gallery is a great regret of mine.

art-seen:

Alfons MuchaSlovanská epopej (The Slav Epic) | 1910-1928

seen at Veletržní Palác, Prague

I visited Prague for a week when I was a much younger man. That I was unable to view The Slav Epic within the National Gallery is a great regret of mine.

(via fuckyeahalphonsemucha)

“Every man is called to give love to the work of his hands. Every man is called to be an artist.”
— Bringing it to the table (Wendell Berry)

(via skullcounty)

crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
“It is better to offer no excuse than a bad one.”
— President George Washington. Advice given in a letter to his niece, Harriet Washington.
prostheticknowledge:

This Artist Is Playing ‘Civilization’ Outside of the Whitney Every Day
Animal New York article on an artist playing a computer game under a bridge outside as performance art:

“Art is easy,” says Diego Leclery. That’s the biggest thing he’s learned in the last three weeks as a participating artist in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. Sitting outside of the Whitney Museum, just under the bridge that leads to the entrance, Leclery plays the video game Civilization seven hours a day, five days a week. The piece is bluntly titled Me Playing Civilization. It’s a performance, it’s a ready-made, and he’ll be doing this until the Biennial wraps up on May 25th.
Civilization is one of the most addictive and longest-running video game franchises of all time. In it, the player rules a civilization, building an empire that competes with other civilizations. In 1996, Computer Gaming World named it the best video game of all time and compared it to crack.
For Leclery, Me Playing Civilization is about “a long standing attempt to subvert overly structured and predictable ways of making things.”

More at Animal New York here

I always knew I was an artist. prostheticknowledge:

This Artist Is Playing ‘Civilization’ Outside of the Whitney Every Day
Animal New York article on an artist playing a computer game under a bridge outside as performance art:

“Art is easy,” says Diego Leclery. That’s the biggest thing he’s learned in the last three weeks as a participating artist in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. Sitting outside of the Whitney Museum, just under the bridge that leads to the entrance, Leclery plays the video game Civilization seven hours a day, five days a week. The piece is bluntly titled Me Playing Civilization. It’s a performance, it’s a ready-made, and he’ll be doing this until the Biennial wraps up on May 25th.
Civilization is one of the most addictive and longest-running video game franchises of all time. In it, the player rules a civilization, building an empire that competes with other civilizations. In 1996, Computer Gaming World named it the best video game of all time and compared it to crack.
For Leclery, Me Playing Civilization is about “a long standing attempt to subvert overly structured and predictable ways of making things.”

More at Animal New York here

I always knew I was an artist.

prostheticknowledge:

This Artist Is Playing ‘Civilization’ Outside of the Whitney Every Day

Animal New York article on an artist playing a computer game under a bridge outside as performance art:

“Art is easy,” says Diego Leclery. That’s the biggest thing he’s learned in the last three weeks as a participating artist in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. Sitting outside of the Whitney Museum, just under the bridge that leads to the entrance, Leclery plays the video game Civilization seven hours a day, five days a week. The piece is bluntly titled Me Playing Civilization. It’s a performance, it’s a ready-made, and he’ll be doing this until the Biennial wraps up on May 25th.

Civilization is one of the most addictive and longest-running video game franchises of all time. In it, the player rules a civilization, building an empire that competes with other civilizations. In 1996, Computer Gaming World named it the best video game of all time and compared it to crack.

For Leclery, Me Playing Civilization is about “a long standing attempt to subvert overly structured and predictable ways of making things.”

More at Animal New York here

I always knew I was an artist.

killscreen:

[by Frontier Nerds, via Retronator]

YES.
businessinsider:

You can’t expect negotiations with French to be like negotations with Americans, and the same holds true for cultures around the world.
These diagrams reveal how to negotiate with people around the world. 

ataxiwardance: My humble addition: “Tumblr.”

Exposure to information -> immediate pre-rational emotional endorsement or rejection -> semi-conscious categorization of stimulus into category of emotion -> pre-packaged single word synopsis of said emotion
e.g. “Dead” or “This” or “I can’t.”
businessinsider:

You can’t expect negotiations with French to be like negotations with Americans, and the same holds true for cultures around the world.
These diagrams reveal how to negotiate with people around the world. 

ataxiwardance: My humble addition: “Tumblr.”

Exposure to information -> immediate pre-rational emotional endorsement or rejection -> semi-conscious categorization of stimulus into category of emotion -> pre-packaged single word synopsis of said emotion
e.g. “Dead” or “This” or “I can’t.”
businessinsider:

You can’t expect negotiations with French to be like negotations with Americans, and the same holds true for cultures around the world.
These diagrams reveal how to negotiate with people around the world. 

ataxiwardance: My humble addition: “Tumblr.”

Exposure to information -> immediate pre-rational emotional endorsement or rejection -> semi-conscious categorization of stimulus into category of emotion -> pre-packaged single word synopsis of said emotion
e.g. “Dead” or “This” or “I can’t.”
businessinsider:

You can’t expect negotiations with French to be like negotations with Americans, and the same holds true for cultures around the world.
These diagrams reveal how to negotiate with people around the world. 

ataxiwardance: My humble addition: “Tumblr.”

Exposure to information -> immediate pre-rational emotional endorsement or rejection -> semi-conscious categorization of stimulus into category of emotion -> pre-packaged single word synopsis of said emotion
e.g. “Dead” or “This” or “I can’t.”
businessinsider:

You can’t expect negotiations with French to be like negotations with Americans, and the same holds true for cultures around the world.
These diagrams reveal how to negotiate with people around the world. 

ataxiwardance: My humble addition: “Tumblr.”

Exposure to information -> immediate pre-rational emotional endorsement or rejection -> semi-conscious categorization of stimulus into category of emotion -> pre-packaged single word synopsis of said emotion
e.g. “Dead” or “This” or “I can’t.”

businessinsider:

You can’t expect negotiations with French to be like negotations with Americans, and the same holds true for cultures around the world.

These diagrams reveal how to negotiate with people around the world. 

ataxiwardance: My humble addition: “Tumblr.”

Exposure to information -> immediate pre-rational emotional endorsement or rejection -> semi-conscious categorization of stimulus into category of emotion -> pre-packaged single word synopsis of said emotion

e.g. “Dead” or “This” or “I can’t.”

(via perfectible)

“People want the rugged authenticity of being different without actually being punished for it — and I understand why they do it. I recognize the insecurity. Just a decade ago, my peers were flinging words like “terrorist” and “faggot” to me in the halls of our high school. Now I’m “trendy” and “fierce.” Either assessment rings lonely and desperate. How they are tremendously afraid of being insignificant. How the fantasy of race that they have projected on my body makes me have some mystic power they are jealous of. They are afraid of boring. They are afraid of being nothing. They are in a constant state of falling — grasping for all of the bindis, beards, dashikis, gauges that they hold on to to feel relevant. And what hurts the most is that when they do it, it magically becomes beautiful. It becomes a beard worth $8,500 and not a beard worth five bullets. When the white body wears our scars, they finally become beautiful.”