One may well ask: “How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?”

The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust. I would be the first to advocate obeying just laws. One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws. I would agree with St. Augustine that “an unjust law is no law at all.”

Now, what is the difference between the two? How does one determine whether a law is just or unjust? A just law is a man made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of St. Thomas Aquinas: An unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law and natural law. Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust. All segregation statutes are unjust because segregation distorts the soul and damages the personality. It gives the segregator a false sense of superiority and the segregated a false sense of inferiority. Segregation, to use the terminology of the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber, substitutes an “I it” relationship for an “I thou” relationship and ends up relegating persons to the status of things. Hence segregation is not only politically, economically and sociologically unsound, it is morally wrong and sinful. Paul Tillich has said that sin is separation. Is not segregation an existential expression of man’s tragic separation, his awful estrangement, his terrible sinfulness? Thus it is that I can urge men to obey the 1954 decision of the Supreme Court, for it is morally right; and I can urge them to disobey segregation ordinances, for they are morally wrong.

– Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter from a Birmingham Jail, 1963

absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)
What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.
Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.
absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)
What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.
Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.
absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)
What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.
Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.
absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)
What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.
Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.
absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)
What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.
Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.
absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)
What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.
Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.
absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)
What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.
Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.
absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)
What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.
Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.
absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)
What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.
Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.
absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)
What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.
Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.

absurdlakefront:

overanalysed:

Stonewall Riots, June 28, 1969 (and following days)

What I can’t think stop thinking about is how brave it was to be part of this movement, because — on top of all the other brave things — they were outing themselves to the police and the media and maybe their families at a time when it was even more frightening to be out.

Also, struck by the fact that I’ve never seen these photos before. This is a part of the American civil rights movement that we didn’t study in school.

‘Tis the reason for the season.

Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the most important and radical political activists of the 20th century. Not “civil rights figures.” Not “African American leaders.” Not “non-violent reformists.” When I say “radical political activist,” that is exactly what I mean. The scope of his vision for a better world was wide in breadth and deep in root. In his 13 short years of public activism, he (and his many allies) courageously addressed issues of race, class, materialism, war, moral culture, sex, and religion. The medicine Dr. King prescribed for each of these interrelated topics was bitter and centered around a “radical revolution of values" (video here).
On this blog, I’ve noted modern culture’s attempt to retroactively "speak for" and water down Dr. King’s truly radical politics several times. This impulse to memorialize and canonize Dr. King and his ideas is so strong, you might think we as a people had actually consummated his vision for a better America. Sadly, I suspect the true reason to be much more banal; that is, we memorialize because “it is easier to build monuments than to make a better world.”
Well. Today is once again Martin Luther King Jr. Day and I thought I’d use the occasion for a somewhat novel purpose. Instead of focusing on the richness of Dr. King’s activism, I’d like to share a singular example of how this nation’s federal government thanked him for his efforts at peaceful democratic change. The following is from the excellent website “Letters of Note.”
In November of 1964, fearful of his connection to the Communist Partythrough Stanley Levison, the FBI anonymously sent Martin Luther King the following threatening letter, along with a cassette that contained allegedly incriminating audio recordings of King with women in various hotel rooms — the fruits of a 9 month surveillance project headed by William C. Sullivan.Unsurprisingly, King saw the strongly worded letter as an invitation for him to take his own life, as did an official investigation in 1976 which concluded that the letter “clearly implied that suicide would be a suitable course of action for Dr. King.”Transcript follows, free of most redactions.







KING,In view of your low grade… I will not dignify your name with either a Mr. or a Reverend or a Dr. And, your last name calls to mind only the type of King such as King Henry the VIII… King, look into your heart. You know you are a complete fraud and a great liability to all of us Negroes. White people in this country have enough frauds of their own but I am sure they don’t have one at this time anywhere near your equal. You are no clergyman and you know it. I repeat you are a colossal fraud and an evil, vicious one at that. You could not believe in God… Clearly you don’t believe in any personal moral principles. King, like all frauds your end is approaching. You could have been our greatest leader. You, even at an early age have turned out to be not a leader but a dissolute, abnormal moral imbecile. We will now have to depend on our older leaders like Wilkins, a man of character and thank God we have others like him. But you are done. Your “honorary” degrees, your Nobel Prize (what a grim farce) and other awards will not save you. King, I repeat you are done. No person can overcome facts, not even a fraud like yourself… I repeat — no person can argue successfully against facts… Satan could not do more. What incredible evilness… King you are done. The American public, the church organizations that have been helping — Protestant, Catholic and Jews will know you for what you are — an evil, abnormal beast. So will others who have backed you. You are done. King, there is only one thing left for you to do. You know what it is. You have just 34 days in which to do it (this exact number has been selected for a specific reason, it has definite practical significance). You are done. There is but one way out for you. You better take it before your filthy, abnormal fraudulent self is bared to the nation.







Dr. King was not perfect, no man can be; but he was brave and righteous, which few even attempt. Let’s take this moment to remember not only his beautiful vision for the way-the-world-could-be, but also the wretched way the world-as-it-was thanked him for his efforts.  Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the most important and radical political activists of the 20th century. Not “civil rights figures.” Not “African American leaders.” Not “non-violent reformists.” When I say “radical political activist,” that is exactly what I mean. The scope of his vision for a better world was wide in breadth and deep in root. In his 13 short years of public activism, he (and his many allies) courageously addressed issues of race, class, materialism, war, moral culture, sex, and religion. The medicine Dr. King prescribed for each of these interrelated topics was bitter and centered around a “radical revolution of values" (video here).
On this blog, I’ve noted modern culture’s attempt to retroactively "speak for" and water down Dr. King’s truly radical politics several times. This impulse to memorialize and canonize Dr. King and his ideas is so strong, you might think we as a people had actually consummated his vision for a better America. Sadly, I suspect the true reason to be much more banal; that is, we memorialize because “it is easier to build monuments than to make a better world.”
Well. Today is once again Martin Luther King Jr. Day and I thought I’d use the occasion for a somewhat novel purpose. Instead of focusing on the richness of Dr. King’s activism, I’d like to share a singular example of how this nation’s federal government thanked him for his efforts at peaceful democratic change. The following is from the excellent website “Letters of Note.”
In November of 1964, fearful of his connection to the Communist Partythrough Stanley Levison, the FBI anonymously sent Martin Luther King the following threatening letter, along with a cassette that contained allegedly incriminating audio recordings of King with women in various hotel rooms — the fruits of a 9 month surveillance project headed by William C. Sullivan.Unsurprisingly, King saw the strongly worded letter as an invitation for him to take his own life, as did an official investigation in 1976 which concluded that the letter “clearly implied that suicide would be a suitable course of action for Dr. King.”Transcript follows, free of most redactions.







KING,In view of your low grade… I will not dignify your name with either a Mr. or a Reverend or a Dr. And, your last name calls to mind only the type of King such as King Henry the VIII… King, look into your heart. You know you are a complete fraud and a great liability to all of us Negroes. White people in this country have enough frauds of their own but I am sure they don’t have one at this time anywhere near your equal. You are no clergyman and you know it. I repeat you are a colossal fraud and an evil, vicious one at that. You could not believe in God… Clearly you don’t believe in any personal moral principles. King, like all frauds your end is approaching. You could have been our greatest leader. You, even at an early age have turned out to be not a leader but a dissolute, abnormal moral imbecile. We will now have to depend on our older leaders like Wilkins, a man of character and thank God we have others like him. But you are done. Your “honorary” degrees, your Nobel Prize (what a grim farce) and other awards will not save you. King, I repeat you are done. No person can overcome facts, not even a fraud like yourself… I repeat — no person can argue successfully against facts… Satan could not do more. What incredible evilness… King you are done. The American public, the church organizations that have been helping — Protestant, Catholic and Jews will know you for what you are — an evil, abnormal beast. So will others who have backed you. You are done. King, there is only one thing left for you to do. You know what it is. You have just 34 days in which to do it (this exact number has been selected for a specific reason, it has definite practical significance). You are done. There is but one way out for you. You better take it before your filthy, abnormal fraudulent self is bared to the nation.







Dr. King was not perfect, no man can be; but he was brave and righteous, which few even attempt. Let’s take this moment to remember not only his beautiful vision for the way-the-world-could-be, but also the wretched way the world-as-it-was thanked him for his efforts. 

Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the most important and radical political activists of the 20th century. Not “civil rights figures.” Not “African American leaders.” Not “non-violent reformists.” When I say “radical political activist,” that is exactly what I mean. The scope of his vision for a better world was wide in breadth and deep in root. In his 13 short years of public activism, he (and his many allies) courageously addressed issues of race, class, materialism, war, moral culture, sex, and religion. The medicine Dr. King prescribed for each of these interrelated topics was bitter and centered around a “radical revolution of values(video here).

On this blog, I’ve noted modern culture’s attempt to retroactively "speak for" and water down Dr. King’s truly radical politics several times. This impulse to memorialize and canonize Dr. King and his ideas is so strong, you might think we as a people had actually consummated his vision for a better America. Sadly, I suspect the true reason to be much more banal; that is, we memorialize because “it is easier to build monuments than to make a better world.”

Well. Today is once again Martin Luther King Jr. Day and I thought I’d use the occasion for a somewhat novel purpose. Instead of focusing on the richness of Dr. King’s activism, I’d like to share a singular example of how this nation’s federal government thanked him for his efforts at peaceful democratic change. The following is from the excellent website “Letters of Note.”

In November of 1964, fearful of his connection to the Communist Partythrough Stanley Levison, the FBI anonymously sent Martin Luther King the following threatening letter, along with a cassette that contained allegedly incriminating audio recordings of King with women in various hotel rooms — the fruits of a 9 month surveillance project headed by William C. Sullivan.

Unsurprisingly, King saw the strongly worded letter as an invitation for him to take his own life, as did an official investigation in 1976 which concluded that the letter “clearly implied that suicide would be a suitable course of action for Dr. King.”

Transcript follows, free of most redactions.

KING,

In view of your low grade… I will not dignify your name with either a Mr. or a Reverend or a Dr. And, your last name calls to mind only the type of King such as King Henry the VIII… 

King, look into your heart. You know you are a complete fraud and a great liability to all of us Negroes. White people in this country have enough frauds of their own but I am sure they don’t have one at this time anywhere near your equal. You are no clergyman and you know it. I repeat you are a colossal fraud and an evil, vicious one at that. You could not believe in God… Clearly you don’t believe in any personal moral principles. 

King, like all frauds your end is approaching. You could have been our greatest leader. You, even at an early age have turned out to be not a leader but a dissolute, abnormal moral imbecile. We will now have to depend on our older leaders like Wilkins, a man of character and thank God we have others like him. But you are done. Your “honorary” degrees, your Nobel Prize (what a grim farce) and other awards will not save you. King, I repeat you are done. 

No person can overcome facts, not even a fraud like yourself… I repeat — no person can argue successfully against facts… Satan could not do more. What incredible evilness… King you are done. 

The American public, the church organizations that have been helping — Protestant, Catholic and Jews will know you for what you are — an evil, abnormal beast. So will others who have backed you. You are done. 

King, there is only one thing left for you to do. You know what it is. You have just 34 days in which to do it (this exact number has been selected for a specific reason, it has definite practical significance). You are done. There is but one way out for you. You better take it before your filthy, abnormal fraudulent self is bared to the nation.

Dr. King was not perfect, no man can be; but he was brave and righteous, which few even attempt. Let’s take this moment to remember not only his beautiful vision for the way-the-world-could-be, but also the wretched way the world-as-it-was thanked him for his efforts. 

Hey there internet. 

I was just informed that I have accidentally purchased TWO tickets to the upcoming ACLU:ENGAGE event at the VERY swank SIX10 downtown. I bought the first ticket on opening day and the second one last week when I was informed that “time was running out.” I am not a clever man.

Anywho. I have to give them the name of the other attendee… who doesn’t technically exist because they are a creature of my error and stupidity. Accordingly, I am looking for a date. My IDEAL date is a blind Anne Hathaway with low standards and a weakness for stocky men who eat Mexican food too quickly but, barring that, anyone with a passion for civil liberties and a strong back for sneaking silverware out of the lunch time plenary panel should send me a message ASAP. Even if you don’t come with me, you should still look into attending! Some super cool friends of mine will also be attending!


Oh yeah! I forgot. In addition to a great schedule of panels and workshops, the very funny Aasif Mandvi of Daily Show fame will be speaking. Remember when he embarrassed the entire state of Florida for their instance on continually electing idiots to public office? Good times.

Lurve you Ms. Hathaway,
Scott Kane

WHEN - Saturday, December 1st, 2012
WHERE - Venue SIX10 - 610 S Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL
“I like voting, so I love the “I Voted” stickers. I also like behavioral economics, so I really love that I love the “I Voted” stickers. I especially like it when my expectations for trivial rewards are met, so I did NOT LOVE when I was denied my “I Voted” sticker this morning. Precinct 22 better get its act together by 2014.”
— Yours truly
zoedelaluna:

erosum:

Newark Mayor Cory Booker Responds to a Question about the NJ Marriage Equality Referendum

Booker 2016

Booker / The Basic Tenets of Constitutional Democracy 2016
I really like these guys as a pair. Mayor Booker seems like an upstanding guy and frankly I’m just glad to see tBTofCD finally found someone to run with. zoedelaluna:

erosum:

Newark Mayor Cory Booker Responds to a Question about the NJ Marriage Equality Referendum

Booker 2016

Booker / The Basic Tenets of Constitutional Democracy 2016
I really like these guys as a pair. Mayor Booker seems like an upstanding guy and frankly I’m just glad to see tBTofCD finally found someone to run with. zoedelaluna:

erosum:

Newark Mayor Cory Booker Responds to a Question about the NJ Marriage Equality Referendum

Booker 2016

Booker / The Basic Tenets of Constitutional Democracy 2016
I really like these guys as a pair. Mayor Booker seems like an upstanding guy and frankly I’m just glad to see tBTofCD finally found someone to run with. zoedelaluna:

erosum:

Newark Mayor Cory Booker Responds to a Question about the NJ Marriage Equality Referendum

Booker 2016

Booker / The Basic Tenets of Constitutional Democracy 2016
I really like these guys as a pair. Mayor Booker seems like an upstanding guy and frankly I’m just glad to see tBTofCD finally found someone to run with.

zoedelaluna:

erosum:

Newark Mayor Cory Booker Responds to a Question about the NJ Marriage Equality Referendum

Booker 2016

Booker / The Basic Tenets of Constitutional Democracy 2016

I really like these guys as a pair. Mayor Booker seems like an upstanding guy and frankly I’m just glad to see tBTofCD finally found someone to run with.

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

lafuguedantoine:

P071511PS-0445 by The White House on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
July 15, 2011
“One of the most poignant days of the year was when Ruby Bridges visited the White House. Ruby is the girl portrayed in Norman Rockwell’s famous painting, “The Problem We All Live With,” which depicts Ruby as she is escorted to school on the court-ordered first day of integrated schools in New Orleans in 1960. When the Norman Rockwell Museum loaned the painting to the White House for a short period of time, the President invited Ruby to view the painting while it was on display outside the Oval Office.”
(Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Militias Exercise Their Second Amendment Rights To Protect Occupy Phoenix

In Phoenix, a local “Conservative” militia comes out to protect the Occupy Wall Streetprotesters from police brutality.

I’m sure this has the Corporate media monopolies running scared, they have been working hard to keep people devided into either the “Liberal” or “Conservative” classification. If people start coming together to stop the corporate power grab despite their torrent of lies and distraction what will they do?

Only time will tell, but one thing is for sure, this will never get airplay in the mainstream media.

Wow.

Love this.

Strange bedfellows right?

If you get to the part where the interviewer starts talking about silver and other precious metals… you can probably stop watching.

Fred Shuttlesworth from the pulpit.

Five Things You Should Know About Fred Shuttlesworth

When legendary civil rights activist Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth died today, many Americans had no idea who he was or what he’d accomplished in his 89 years on earth. It’s an unfortunate reality that people often think Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X were the beginning and end of black activism in the Civil Rights era. In fact, nothing could be more wrong. From the 1950s onward, Shuttlesworth was a major factor in ending Jim Crow laws in the South, and many other oppressive forces throughout the United States. Here are the top five things you should know about him.

1. From the start of his career, Shuttlesworth, who was raised poor in Alabama, was fiery and obstinate. After Alabama officially banned the NAACP from operating within the state in 1956, Shuttlesworth, then a pastor, founded the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights. The ACMHR’s first major order of business was a Birmingham bus sit-in, during which Shuttlesworth and others boarded city buses and sat in the “whites only” sections. The ACMHR would eventually become charter member organization in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

2. He lived nearly nine decades, but many people tried to kill Shuttlesworth much earlier for his outspokenness. He was the target of two bomb attacks, one on his home and one on his church. And when Shuttlesworth tried to enroll his daughters in an all-white Birmingham school in 1957, an armed mob attacked him, beating him unconscious and stabbing his wife. The couple survived, and when a doctor remarked that Shuttlesworth was lucky to have avoided a concussion,Shuttlesworth said, “Doctor, the Lord knew I lived in a hard town, so he gave me a hard head.”

3. Though he worked closely with King, Shuttlesworth’s style was decidedly different. “Among the youthful ‘elders’ of the movement,” historian Diane McWhorter told The New York Times, “he was Martin Luther King’s most effective and insistent foil: blunt where King was soothing, driven where King was leisurely, and most important, confrontational where King was conciliatory—meaning, critically, that he was more upsetting than King in the eyes of the white public.” Despite their differences, King once called Shuttlesworth ”the most courageous civil rights fighter in the South.”

4. Shuttlesworth’s fiercest enemy in Birmingham was infamous public safety commissioner Bull Connor. Connor’s violent responses—attack dogs, fire hoses, billy clubs—to Shuttlesworth’s peaceful demonstrations were integral in changing America’s attitude about Jim Crow. “The televised images of Connor directing handlers of police dogs to attack unarmed demonstrators and firefighters’ using hoses to knock down children had a profound effect on American citizens’ view of the civil rights struggle,” says the Shuttlesworth Foundation’s website.

5. After his actions helped spawn the passage of the federal Civil Rights Act in 1964, Shuttlesworth continued fighting for justice in realms both racial and economic. In 1988 he founded the Shuttlesworth Housing Foundation to help low-income families own their own homes, and in 2004 he became president of the SCLC. A firebrand to the end, he resigned from the SCLC within months, saying “deceit, mistrust and a lack of spiritual discipline and truth have eaten at the core of this once-hallowed organization.” Three years ago, the city of Birmingham named its airport after Shuttlesworth. There are still no monuments named after Bull Connor.