“People want the rugged authenticity of being different without actually being punished for it — and I understand why they do it. I recognize the insecurity. Just a decade ago, my peers were flinging words like “terrorist” and “faggot” to me in the halls of our high school. Now I’m “trendy” and “fierce.” Either assessment rings lonely and desperate. How they are tremendously afraid of being insignificant. How the fantasy of race that they have projected on my body makes me have some mystic power they are jealous of. They are afraid of boring. They are afraid of being nothing. They are in a constant state of falling — grasping for all of the bindis, beards, dashikis, gauges that they hold on to to feel relevant. And what hurts the most is that when they do it, it magically becomes beautiful. It becomes a beard worth $8,500 and not a beard worth five bullets. When the white body wears our scars, they finally become beautiful.”

shortformblog:

Janet Napolitano will resign as Secretary of Homeland Security, she announced yesterday. She’ll officially depart in September, to take a new job running the University of California system, leaving vacant a position at the top of the U.S. security apparatus. White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said President Obama would be “very deliberate” in choosing her replacement — New York Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer quickly floated his desire to see NYC Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, a polarizing figure for his oversight of the city’s controversial “stop-and-frisk” policy. (Photo from The National Guardsource

Outside of some comic book villains, I cannot imagine a more foolish pick to head up DHS than Ray “Selection Bias Confuses Me” Kelly. I have very little respect left for President Obama, but appointing Ray Kelly would be a damnable choice.

1. White terrorists are called “gunmen.” What does that even mean? A person with a gun? Wouldn’t that be, like, everyone in the US? Other terrorists are called, like, “terrorists.”

2. White terrorists are “troubled loners.” Other terrorists are always suspected of being part of a global plot, even when they are obviously troubled loners.

3. Doing a study on the danger of white terrorists at the Department of Homeland Security will get you sidelined by angry white Congressmen. Doing studies on other kinds of terrorists is a guaranteed promotion.

4. The family of a white terrorist is interviewed, weeping as they wonder where he went wrong. The families of other terrorists are almost never interviewed.

5. White terrorists are part of a “fringe.” Other terrorists are apparently mainstream.

6. White terrorists are random events, like tornadoes. Other terrorists are long-running conspiracies.

7. White terrorists are never called “white.” But other terrorists are given ethnic affiliations.

8. Nobody thinks white terrorists are typical of white people. But other terrorists are considered paragons of their societies.

9. White terrorists are alcoholics, addicts or mentally ill. Other terrorists are apparently clean-living and perfectly sane.

10. There is nothing you can do about white terrorists. Gun control won’t stop them. No policy you could make, no government program, could possibly have an impact on them. But hundreds of billions of dollars must be spent on police and on the Department of Defense, and on TSA, which must virtually strip search 60 million people a year, to deal with other terrorists.

Juan Cole, 08/09/2012   (via thepeacefulterrorist)

Juan Cole actually wrote this 4 days after a white terrorist, yes, terrorist, murdered 6 and injured 4 people at a Sikh gurdwara in Wisconsin. The terrorist who committed said crime spoke of an impending “racial holy war” beforehand and was a member of white supremacist/neo-Nazi hate groups.

(via mohandasgandhi)

ataxiwardance: I’m not always a fan of Juan Cole, but his point about disparate popular representation of terrorist violence is as obvious as it is worth repeating.

(via jjarichardson)

distinguishedcompany:

itsjohnsen:

A couple who’d moved into an all-white neighbourhood looks at graffiti scrawled in front of their home. Chicago, 1957.
Francis Miller

thenewrepublic:

What do you think about Elizabeth Warren’s claim that she is Native American?

“In truth, given what we know about Warren, we should not be shocked by the revelation. Warren has come to be cherished for her passionate liberalism and even refreshing hipness— occasionally identifying as a Cherokee is very much part of the package here. It also fits in with the culture in which she was raised, and which is still formative today. After all, we all live in an America in which white people are fond of dismissing things and people as “too white” (a remark that 50 years ago would have been completely opaque to liberal cosmopolitans.)”

John McWhorter, Elizabeth Warren’s ‘Native American’ Status and a Bygone Era of Affirmative Action

(Photo courtesy of theatlantic.com)

Excellent article on an important topic and an incredible woman.

"Generally, modern Americans can be almost strangely flexible on setting boundaries to what a culture even is. On separate occasions, I have been criticized for describing black culture as including soul food, a particular kind of humor, and a way of speaking. As such, Elizabeth Warren’s notion of herself as Cherokee—as well as Harvard’s touting her hiring as the inclusion of a “minority” on their faculty—should be understood as simply a sign of the times.

But all of these painfully subtle and protean notions of identity are increasingly showing signs of strain in society. A certain degree of cognitive dissonance was present, of course, from the very beginning of affirmative action programs”

theatlantic:

New Racism Museum Reveals the Ugly Truth Behind Aunt Jemima

David Pilgrim was 12 years old when he bought his first racist object at a flea market: a saltshaker in the shape of a mammy. As a young black boy growing up in Mobile, Alabama, he’d seen similar knick-knacks in the homes of friends and neighbors, and he instinctively hated them. As soon as he handed over his money, he threw his purchase to the ground and shattered it into pieces.

Pilgrim’s story brings to mind the young biblical Abraham, smashing idols in his father’s shop. But that mammy was the only racist icon Pilgrim ever destroyed. Today he owns thousands of them: cereal boxes, statuettes, whites-only signs, and postcards of black men being whipped and hung. The public will soon be able to see his entire collection and more at the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia, which opens April 26 at Ferris University in Michigan where Pilgrim spent years as a sociology professor.

The museum is divided into sections, each reflecting a different distorted vision of black people in America. One features Uncle Toms: cheerful, servile black men like Uncle Ben or the chef on the Cream of Wheat box. Another showcases “brutes”: muscular ogres who lurk in dark alleys and ravish white women. Most of the objects predate civil rights, but there’s a section devoted to modern racism: It includes dozens of caricatures of President Barack Obama as a monkey, a terrorist, and a watermelon-eating “coon.”

Read more. [Images: Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia]

FOLU! The internet has been reading our minds.

spiffingtea:

President Obama sits on the bus where Rosa Parks’ protest began the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Photo via African Americans for Obama.

This picture is so powerful. Unbelievable.

My quotidian disgust and exasperation with the Obama presidency should not surprise any of my followers but even my cold cold heart is not immune to the symbolic and historical gravity of his / our country’s achievements.

horcrvx:

The Trayvon Martin story remains in national headlines this week, but little media attention has been paid to a similarly troubling case: that of Kenneth Chamberlain, Sr., a 68-year-old Marine vet killed in his home last November by police officers in White Plains, NY.

The officers were responding to a false alarm accidentally triggered by Chamberlain’s medical alert pendant while he slept. Instead of helping the man, who had a heart condition, they broke down his front door, tasered him, reportedly called him the “n-word” and mocked him, then shot him dead.

Audio throughout the incident was recorded by his medical alert device.

Read the rest

Disgusted but not even remotely surprised.

I don’t even know what to say right now. 

I am aghast.

I am enraged.

(via slvttering-deactivated20131124)

i12bent:

Tonight’s OF spotlight falls on this controversial figure who had a distinct impact on US political culture in the ’60s and ’70s:
Huey P. Newton (Feb. 17, 1942 - 1989, homicide) -  co-founder  (1966) and leader of the Black Panther Party, and one of the  important  African-American activists in the struggle for civil rights  and the  ability for Blacks to practice self-defense.
Despite many attempts by authorities and racially biased police to   discredit Newton as a common criminal and a murderer, he consistently   proved himself as an intellectual and an organizer and a writer…
“The revolution has always been in the hands of the young. The young always inherit the revolution.” — H.P.N.
Photo: Huey P. Newton handling Highway 61 Revisited - Stephen Shames, 1970

We read People v. Newton as an example of unconsciousness as excuse for criminal liability in my Criminal Law class earlier this semester. Professor Bridges asked the class of ~70 students if anyone knew who Huey Newton was. I have to imagine other people knew who the man was but I was the only one who raised their hand.

i12bent:

Tonight’s OF spotlight falls on this controversial figure who had a distinct impact on US political culture in the ’60s and ’70s:

Huey P. Newton (Feb. 17, 1942 - 1989, homicide) - co-founder (1966) and leader of the Black Panther Party, and one of the important African-American activists in the struggle for civil rights and the ability for Blacks to practice self-defense.

Despite many attempts by authorities and racially biased police to discredit Newton as a common criminal and a murderer, he consistently proved himself as an intellectual and an organizer and a writer…

“The revolution has always been in the hands of the young. The young always inherit the revolution.” — H.P.N.

Photo: Huey P. Newton handling Highway 61 Revisited - Stephen Shames, 1970

We read People v. Newton as an example of unconsciousness as excuse for criminal liability in my Criminal Law class earlier this semester. Professor Bridges asked the class of ~70 students if anyone knew who Huey Newton was. I have to imagine other people knew who the man was but I was the only one who raised their hand.

(via velvetant-deactivated20140416)

…In 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court considered the case of Richard Perry Loving, who was white, and his wife, Mildred Loving, of African American and Native American descent.

The case changed history - and was captured on film by LIFE photographer Grey Villet, whose black-and-white photographs are now set to go on display at the International Center of Photography.

In 2007, 32 years after her husband died, Mrs Loving - who herself passed away the following year - released a statement in support of same-sex marriage. She said: ‘Not a day goes by that I don’t think of Richard and our love, our right to marry, and how much it meant to me to have that freedom to marry the person precious to me, even if others thought he was the “wrong kind of person” for me to marry I believe all Americans, no matter their race, no matter their sex, no matter their sexual orientation, should have that same freedom to marry.’

Photographs of the Loving’s interracial marriage at a time when it was banned in 16 states

Mildred Delores Jeter Loving and her husband Richard Perry Loving were plaintiffs in the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case Loving v. Virginia (1967).

The Lovings were an interracial married couple who were criminally charged under a Virginia statute banning such marriages. With the help of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the Lovings filed suit seeking to overturn the law. In 1967, the Supreme Court ruled in their favor, striking down the Virginia statute and all state anti-miscegenation laws as unconstitutional violations of the Fourteenth Amendment.

(via atomicyawn)