peterrabbit:

dad: are u listening to gregorian chants

me: 

image

Don’t know why this made me smile so much … Maybe because I’m drinking wine and listening to Bach right now?

Clearly, Bach is baroque rather than medieval, but still …

(via ifellowedsleep)

prostheticknowledge:

Six Pacmen
Audio visual performance piece by Tacit Group combines multiplayer Pac-Man with Steve Reich’s modern classical music piece ‘Six Pianos’ - video embedded below:


“Six Pacmen” is a work of art made by utilizing Pacman, the video game which was released in 1980, and Six Pianos of Steve Reich, which was composed in 1973. Performers need to collect items provided, by steering each given packman. One level is complete once 6 performers collect all the items, thereby going to the next measure of the piece. In some levels (or measures) appears a ghost that disturbs the performer. Performers can finish the game by playing all measures. This shows a significant feature of Tacit Group that has been applying games like Tetris and puzzles to pieces of art.

Not the first time the team have combined music with gaming - they have also performed abstract compositions with a Testris style interface [link]
You can find out more about the Tacit Group here

It’s everything I’ve ever wanted … prostheticknowledge:

Six Pacmen
Audio visual performance piece by Tacit Group combines multiplayer Pac-Man with Steve Reich’s modern classical music piece ‘Six Pianos’ - video embedded below:


“Six Pacmen” is a work of art made by utilizing Pacman, the video game which was released in 1980, and Six Pianos of Steve Reich, which was composed in 1973. Performers need to collect items provided, by steering each given packman. One level is complete once 6 performers collect all the items, thereby going to the next measure of the piece. In some levels (or measures) appears a ghost that disturbs the performer. Performers can finish the game by playing all measures. This shows a significant feature of Tacit Group that has been applying games like Tetris and puzzles to pieces of art.

Not the first time the team have combined music with gaming - they have also performed abstract compositions with a Testris style interface [link]
You can find out more about the Tacit Group here

It’s everything I’ve ever wanted …

prostheticknowledge:

Six Pacmen

Audio visual performance piece by Tacit Group combines multiplayer Pac-Man with Steve Reich’s modern classical music piece ‘Six Pianos’ - video embedded below:

“Six Pacmen” is a work of art made by utilizing Pacman, the video game which was released in 1980, and Six Pianos of Steve Reich, which was composed in 1973. Performers need to collect items provided, by steering each given packman. One level is complete once 6 performers collect all the items, thereby going to the next measure of the piece. In some levels (or measures) appears a ghost that disturbs the performer. Performers can finish the game by playing all measures. This shows a significant feature of Tacit Group that has been applying games like Tetris and puzzles to pieces of art.

Not the first time the team have combined music with gaming - they have also performed abstract compositions with a Testris style interface [link]

You can find out more about the Tacit Group here

It’s everything I’ve ever wanted …

Leoš Janáček - Overture - From the House of the Dead (Z mrtvého domu)

Hey Internet, 

I’m busy at work and about to abscond to the Pennsylvania backwoods for a long weekend of fraternity / boxing / booze. However, today is Claude Debussy’s 151st birthday and this disciple will not the date pass without commemoration.

Last year I assembled a “tour” - a playlist and text accompaniment - of my favorite Debussy works. You can find the tour below. If you’re a fan, check it out. If you’re not a fan, you will be.

Ciao,

Scott

ataxiwardance:

Debussy - Selected Works

"There is no theory. You have only to listen. Pleasure is the law. I love music passionately. And because l love it, I try to free it from barren traditions that stifle it. It is a free art gushing forth — an open-air art, boundless as the elements, the wind, the sky, the sea. It must never be shut in and become an academic art.” - Claude Debussy

August 22nd, 2012 was Debussy’s 150th birthday. If you’ve been paying attention, you know this is kind of a big deal to me. Yet, in my preoccupation with job interviews, socializing with the hoi oligoi, and general revelry, I did not memorialize the occasion.

Shame shame shame.

As an act of atonement towards my patron saint of music, I’ve decided to assemble a collection of my favorite Debussy compositions and share them with my tiny corner of the internet. In an attempt at restraint, I gave myself a meager allocation: 20 “tracks”. This paltry allocation was built out from a prior mix I had made for my (impossibly lovely) friend Sandra which emphasized slightly lesser known or under-appreciated works. This means that many of Debussy’s “greatest hits” are not listed here. This includes Clair de Lune, the two Arabesques, and the revolutionary Prelude. These are beautiful and immortal pieces but, frankly, I assume anyone’s whose ever watched a sappy romantic comedy is already familiar with them. Of course petty obscurantism was not my intention. Both Réverie and the Girl with Flaxen Hair make an appearance. Simply trying to avoid giving a tour of the obvious.

There’s no strict logic behind the ordering of the tracks but some thematic patterns can be noticed:

Cathedrals

We begin, appropriately enough, with two Preludes. Both demonstrate Debussy’s revolutionary vision of harmonic architecture. Debussy’s powerful chord stacking evokes images of majestic Gothic towers and his cascading melodic phrases make for ornate decorations atop every parapet. 

Dances

Then a bit of footwork. The Danses pair perfectly and the Waltz and Sarabande make fine partners in triple step. Little known fact: you CAN shake it to Debussy. Ah! And what’s a dance without community? Listening to La Plus Que Lente, one cannot help but imagine Debussy and Satie enjoying a drink together at a small cafe in Monmarte. The orchestration of the Sarabande also seems a perfect tribute to the complex, but undeniable, influence Debussy had on the younger Ravel.

Bodies of Water

Next, Debussy’s beloved sea. We go on a tour of all waters: First turbulent and treacherous; later buoyant and jocular. Debussy, I think unique among composers, appreciated the beauty of waves and winds. The flux and flow of water into and upon itself. Movement without destination. 

"Music is the expression of the movement of the waters, the play of curves described by changing breezes."

Dreams

No tour or exploration of Debussy’s genius would be complete with at least a nod towards his exploration of the space between the conscious and subconscious. He was a master of blurring the boundaries between fantasy and reality; Debussy’s world seems so often dominated by what is felt rather than what known. Because so much of his music lives at the intersection of sensoral experience and cognition, it’s unsurprising he is often pigeon-holed as an dream-like “Impressionist” composer.

Foreign Lands

A quick travelogue through Debussy’s flirtacious orientalism follows. What I wouldn’t give to have been with him at the 1889 Paris Universal Exposition. To witness a genius mind processing the quixotic quarter-tone of javanese gamelan music for the first time. His was a far sighted cross cultural brilliance. From a letter to a friend:

Do you remember the Javanese music, able to express every shade of meaning, even unmentionable shades … which make our tonic and dominant seem like ghosts, for use by naughty little children?” 

Beginnings

At last, we end with his beginning. To understand Debussy, you must appreciate his natural tendency towards rebellion. Debussy, like Napolean, was historical revolution made manifest in a man. To continue the historical analogies, I imagine Debussy at the Conservatoire de Paris in the same way I picture Luther at Catechism. Beau Soir is one of his first works, written as a young man of twenty or so, and, like the Prelude, is a poetic adaption based on lyrics from Paul Bourget. He has already mastered the language he would come to destroy. Even in this simple parlor song, you can hear the tired boundaries of the Western tradition start to ache and sway. We close with these words:

A plea to relish the charm of life

While there is youth and the evening is fair,

For we pass away, as the wave passes:

The wave to the sea, we to the grave.

Teeb - “Claude Debussy - Claire De Lune” / “Drake - Over” (Mash Up)

Happy 151th Birthday to my favorite composer and seminal figure in Western Art Music - Claude Debussy. 

Happy Wednesday to Drake.

The Stunning Grandeur of the World’s Great Opera Houses 
David Leventi’s “Opera” photo project. Really stunning stuff. Photos that take the air out of you and replace it with a sense of awe and august majesty. Top to bottom, left to right, they are:
Teatro di San Carlo, Naples, Italy, 2009
Teatro La Fenice, Venice, Italy, 2008
Metropolitan Opera, New York City, 2008
Romanian Athenaeum, Bucharest, Romania, 2007
Drottningholm Palace Theatre, Stockholm, Sweden, 2008
Estates Theatre, Prague, Czech Republic, 2008
Palais Garnier, Paris, 2009
I think my favorite is the last, the Palais Garnier. Look at that ceiling!  The Stunning Grandeur of the World’s Great Opera Houses 
David Leventi’s “Opera” photo project. Really stunning stuff. Photos that take the air out of you and replace it with a sense of awe and august majesty. Top to bottom, left to right, they are:
Teatro di San Carlo, Naples, Italy, 2009
Teatro La Fenice, Venice, Italy, 2008
Metropolitan Opera, New York City, 2008
Romanian Athenaeum, Bucharest, Romania, 2007
Drottningholm Palace Theatre, Stockholm, Sweden, 2008
Estates Theatre, Prague, Czech Republic, 2008
Palais Garnier, Paris, 2009
I think my favorite is the last, the Palais Garnier. Look at that ceiling!  The Stunning Grandeur of the World’s Great Opera Houses 
David Leventi’s “Opera” photo project. Really stunning stuff. Photos that take the air out of you and replace it with a sense of awe and august majesty. Top to bottom, left to right, they are:
Teatro di San Carlo, Naples, Italy, 2009
Teatro La Fenice, Venice, Italy, 2008
Metropolitan Opera, New York City, 2008
Romanian Athenaeum, Bucharest, Romania, 2007
Drottningholm Palace Theatre, Stockholm, Sweden, 2008
Estates Theatre, Prague, Czech Republic, 2008
Palais Garnier, Paris, 2009
I think my favorite is the last, the Palais Garnier. Look at that ceiling!  The Stunning Grandeur of the World’s Great Opera Houses 
David Leventi’s “Opera” photo project. Really stunning stuff. Photos that take the air out of you and replace it with a sense of awe and august majesty. Top to bottom, left to right, they are:
Teatro di San Carlo, Naples, Italy, 2009
Teatro La Fenice, Venice, Italy, 2008
Metropolitan Opera, New York City, 2008
Romanian Athenaeum, Bucharest, Romania, 2007
Drottningholm Palace Theatre, Stockholm, Sweden, 2008
Estates Theatre, Prague, Czech Republic, 2008
Palais Garnier, Paris, 2009
I think my favorite is the last, the Palais Garnier. Look at that ceiling!  The Stunning Grandeur of the World’s Great Opera Houses 
David Leventi’s “Opera” photo project. Really stunning stuff. Photos that take the air out of you and replace it with a sense of awe and august majesty. Top to bottom, left to right, they are:
Teatro di San Carlo, Naples, Italy, 2009
Teatro La Fenice, Venice, Italy, 2008
Metropolitan Opera, New York City, 2008
Romanian Athenaeum, Bucharest, Romania, 2007
Drottningholm Palace Theatre, Stockholm, Sweden, 2008
Estates Theatre, Prague, Czech Republic, 2008
Palais Garnier, Paris, 2009
I think my favorite is the last, the Palais Garnier. Look at that ceiling!  The Stunning Grandeur of the World’s Great Opera Houses 
David Leventi’s “Opera” photo project. Really stunning stuff. Photos that take the air out of you and replace it with a sense of awe and august majesty. Top to bottom, left to right, they are:
Teatro di San Carlo, Naples, Italy, 2009
Teatro La Fenice, Venice, Italy, 2008
Metropolitan Opera, New York City, 2008
Romanian Athenaeum, Bucharest, Romania, 2007
Drottningholm Palace Theatre, Stockholm, Sweden, 2008
Estates Theatre, Prague, Czech Republic, 2008
Palais Garnier, Paris, 2009
I think my favorite is the last, the Palais Garnier. Look at that ceiling!  The Stunning Grandeur of the World’s Great Opera Houses 
David Leventi’s “Opera” photo project. Really stunning stuff. Photos that take the air out of you and replace it with a sense of awe and august majesty. Top to bottom, left to right, they are:
Teatro di San Carlo, Naples, Italy, 2009
Teatro La Fenice, Venice, Italy, 2008
Metropolitan Opera, New York City, 2008
Romanian Athenaeum, Bucharest, Romania, 2007
Drottningholm Palace Theatre, Stockholm, Sweden, 2008
Estates Theatre, Prague, Czech Republic, 2008
Palais Garnier, Paris, 2009
I think my favorite is the last, the Palais Garnier. Look at that ceiling! 

The Stunning Grandeur of the World’s Great Opera Houses

David Leventi’s “Opera” photo project. Really stunning stuff. Photos that take the air out of you and replace it with a sense of awe and august majesty. Top to bottom, left to right, they are:

  • Teatro di San Carlo, Naples, Italy, 2009
  • Teatro La Fenice, Venice, Italy, 2008
  • Metropolitan Opera, New York City, 2008
  • Romanian Athenaeum, Bucharest, Romania, 2007
  • Drottningholm Palace Theatre, Stockholm, Sweden, 2008
  • Estates Theatre, Prague, Czech Republic, 2008
  • Palais Garnier, Paris, 2009

I think my favorite is the last, the Palais Garnier. Look at that ceiling! 

SANNNNNNNNNNDRAAAAAAAAA!!!

A FRIENDLY REMINDER!

Seal’s 1995 smash-hit “Kiss From a Rose” is basically an “homage” to the pre-Baroque folk “Romanesca" (examples here and here) … pulverized into the wretched shape of a sentimental pop ballad.

Further, the lyrics seem to directly appropriate and combine two of Shakespeare’s most famous piece of prose - “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? (Sonnet 18) and "A rose by any other name would smell as sweet" (Romeo & Juliet). 

Lastly, the song owes its success to playing during the credits of Batman Forever - a schlocky morality play depicting a cadre of men in tights who quarrel. Also a car drive-flies up the side of a building and Jim Carey wears a tiara. 

THIS HAS BEEN A FRIENDLY REMINDER!

Dargaud’s “Siegfried”

Man… We live in a world of multiple Twilight films. How did this never get made?