“Whoever loves money never has money enough; whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with his income. This too is meaningless. As goods increase, so do those who consume them. And what benefit are they to the owner except to feast his eyes on them? The sleep of a laborer is sweet, whether he eats little or much, but the abundance of a rich man permits him no sleep.”
— Ecclesiastes 5:10-12

The People’s Budget

  • Deficit reduction of $5.6 trillion
  • Primary spending cuts of $869 billion
  • Net interest savings of $856 billion
  • Total spending cuts of $1.7 trillion
  • Revenue increase of $3.9 trillion
  • Public investment of $1.7 trillion
  • Budget surplus of $30.7 billion in 2021, debt at 64.1% of GDP.

Support for the People’s Budget

Paul Krugman

“genuinely courageous”

“achieves this without dismantling the legacy of the New Deal”

Dean Baker

"if you want a serious effort to balance the budget, here it is."

Jeffrey Sachs

“A bolt of hope…humane, responsible, and most of all sensible”

The Economist

“Courageous”

“Mr Ryan’s plan adds (by its own claims) $6 trillion to the national debt over the next decade, but promises to balance the budget by sometime in the 2030s by cutting programmes for the poor and the elderly. The Progressive Caucus’s plan would (by its own claims) balance the budget by 2021 by cutting defence spending and raising taxes, mainly on rich people.”

The New Republic

“In passing, Miller also draws attention something that’s gotten far too little attention in this debate. The most fiscally responsible plan seems to be neither the Republicans’ nor the president’s. It’s theCongressional Progressive Caucus plan…”

The Washington Post

"It’s much more courageous to propose taxes on the rich and powerful than spending cuts on the poor and disabled."

Rachel Maddow

“Balances the budget 20 years earlier than Paul Ryan even tries to”

The Guardian

“the most fiscally responsible in town… would balance the books by 2021“

The Nation

the strongest rebuke…to the unconscionable ‘Ryan Budget’ for FY 2012.”

Center for American Progress

once again put[s] requiring more sacrifice from the luckiest among us back on the table”

Economic Policy Institute

National budget policy should adequately fund up-front job creation, invest in long-term economic growth, reform the tax code, and put the debt on a sustainable path while protecting the economic security of low-income Americans and growing the middle class. The proposal by the Congressional Progressive caucus achieves all of these goals.”

to my mind, CPC’s “The People’s Budget” is the most interesting thing being discussed in fiscal politics these days.

also, Dean Baker has been the single most important Economist / Commentator in America for the last 5 years and continues his righteous reign to the present moment. meeting him last year was definitely a high point of my professional life. 

ohgeography:

grrlpower:

seanxvx:

dtron:

( via crustyriotqueer:cutmywires:guesswhatsvegan)
Women and their maids: A photographic leveling
Thanks  Sociological Images for posting about Justine Graham and Ruby Rumié’s  new photo project.  The two photographers went around Argentina, Chile,  and Columbia and photographed pairs of women and their maids.  The women  are wearing no accessories and have similar clothing on, so the viewer  looking to establish which woman is the maid has no recourse to the  standard markers in which class is established.  This symbolic leveling  could be read as a humanist impulse— we are all people, class  difference doesn’t matter— but I think the photographers may be doing  something more complex by making people aware of how strong the  compulsion is to order people by class.  Furthermore, without class  markers to rely on, viewers may read class from other physical  characteristics (race, body shape).  Because white guilt racism-deniers  tend to claim that race and class are separate, raising consciousness  about how we read class from race is an ambitious project.  The fact  that their work was created in South America where colorism, not a  white/black race binary, tends to frame racial discrimination and class  status makes the project even more thought-provoking.



ohgeography:

grrlpower:

seanxvx:

dtron:

( via crustyriotqueer:cutmywires:guesswhatsvegan)
Women and their maids: A photographic leveling
Thanks  Sociological Images for posting about Justine Graham and Ruby Rumié’s  new photo project.  The two photographers went around Argentina, Chile,  and Columbia and photographed pairs of women and their maids.  The women  are wearing no accessories and have similar clothing on, so the viewer  looking to establish which woman is the maid has no recourse to the  standard markers in which class is established.  This symbolic leveling  could be read as a humanist impulse— we are all people, class  difference doesn’t matter— but I think the photographers may be doing  something more complex by making people aware of how strong the  compulsion is to order people by class.  Furthermore, without class  markers to rely on, viewers may read class from other physical  characteristics (race, body shape).  Because white guilt racism-deniers  tend to claim that race and class are separate, raising consciousness  about how we read class from race is an ambitious project.  The fact  that their work was created in South America where colorism, not a  white/black race binary, tends to frame racial discrimination and class  status makes the project even more thought-provoking.



ohgeography:

grrlpower:

seanxvx:

dtron:

( via crustyriotqueer:cutmywires:guesswhatsvegan)
Women and their maids: A photographic leveling
Thanks  Sociological Images for posting about Justine Graham and Ruby Rumié’s  new photo project.  The two photographers went around Argentina, Chile,  and Columbia and photographed pairs of women and their maids.  The women  are wearing no accessories and have similar clothing on, so the viewer  looking to establish which woman is the maid has no recourse to the  standard markers in which class is established.  This symbolic leveling  could be read as a humanist impulse— we are all people, class  difference doesn’t matter— but I think the photographers may be doing  something more complex by making people aware of how strong the  compulsion is to order people by class.  Furthermore, without class  markers to rely on, viewers may read class from other physical  characteristics (race, body shape).  Because white guilt racism-deniers  tend to claim that race and class are separate, raising consciousness  about how we read class from race is an ambitious project.  The fact  that their work was created in South America where colorism, not a  white/black race binary, tends to frame racial discrimination and class  status makes the project even more thought-provoking.



ohgeography:

grrlpower:

seanxvx:

dtron:

( via crustyriotqueer:cutmywires:guesswhatsvegan)
Women and their maids: A photographic leveling
Thanks  Sociological Images for posting about Justine Graham and Ruby Rumié’s  new photo project.  The two photographers went around Argentina, Chile,  and Columbia and photographed pairs of women and their maids.  The women  are wearing no accessories and have similar clothing on, so the viewer  looking to establish which woman is the maid has no recourse to the  standard markers in which class is established.  This symbolic leveling  could be read as a humanist impulse— we are all people, class  difference doesn’t matter— but I think the photographers may be doing  something more complex by making people aware of how strong the  compulsion is to order people by class.  Furthermore, without class  markers to rely on, viewers may read class from other physical  characteristics (race, body shape).  Because white guilt racism-deniers  tend to claim that race and class are separate, raising consciousness  about how we read class from race is an ambitious project.  The fact  that their work was created in South America where colorism, not a  white/black race binary, tends to frame racial discrimination and class  status makes the project even more thought-provoking.



ohgeography:

grrlpower:

seanxvx:

dtron:

( via crustyriotqueer:cutmywires:guesswhatsvegan)
Women and their maids: A photographic leveling
Thanks  Sociological Images for posting about Justine Graham and Ruby Rumié’s  new photo project.  The two photographers went around Argentina, Chile,  and Columbia and photographed pairs of women and their maids.  The women  are wearing no accessories and have similar clothing on, so the viewer  looking to establish which woman is the maid has no recourse to the  standard markers in which class is established.  This symbolic leveling  could be read as a humanist impulse— we are all people, class  difference doesn’t matter— but I think the photographers may be doing  something more complex by making people aware of how strong the  compulsion is to order people by class.  Furthermore, without class  markers to rely on, viewers may read class from other physical  characteristics (race, body shape).  Because white guilt racism-deniers  tend to claim that race and class are separate, raising consciousness  about how we read class from race is an ambitious project.  The fact  that their work was created in South America where colorism, not a  white/black race binary, tends to frame racial discrimination and class  status makes the project even more thought-provoking.

ohgeography:

grrlpower:

seanxvx:

dtron:

( via crustyriotqueer:cutmywires:guesswhatsvegan)

Women and their maids: A photographic leveling

Thanks Sociological Images for posting about Justine Graham and Ruby Rumié’s new photo project.  The two photographers went around Argentina, Chile, and Columbia and photographed pairs of women and their maids.  The women are wearing no accessories and have similar clothing on, so the viewer looking to establish which woman is the maid has no recourse to the standard markers in which class is established.  This symbolic leveling could be read as a humanist impulse— we are all people, class difference doesn’t matter— but I think the photographers may be doing something more complex by making people aware of how strong the compulsion is to order people by class.  Furthermore, without class markers to rely on, viewers may read class from other physical characteristics (race, body shape).  Because white guilt racism-deniers tend to claim that race and class are separate, raising consciousness about how we read class from race is an ambitious project.  The fact that their work was created in South America where colorism, not a white/black race binary, tends to frame racial discrimination and class status makes the project even more thought-provoking.

unburyingthelead:

The bipartisan 70-28 vote to pass the bill sends it to the House, where many Democrats say it is too puny — and where a revolt was brewing among lawmakers who said its allocation of highway money among the states is unfair. But pressure is on to pass it anyway to score a badly needed win for President Barack Obama and a Democratic Party that’s dropped badly in opinion polls and faces major losses in midterm elections.

Why must people always use sports terminology when reporting things like this?

subtilejagden:

honeybadgerz:
(via creepysheshefaced)

retropolitics:

Detroit, MI. 1938: Units of the American Federation of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Oraganization marching in the Labor Day Parade. Photographer: William Vandivert (via)