“'In America today, we have the most unequal distribution of wealth and income of any major country on Earth. Incredibly, the top 1 percent owns 42 percent of the nation’s wealth while the bottom 60 percent owns just 2.3 percent. In the last study done on income distribution, we learned that 93 percent of all new income generated between 2009 and 2010 went to the top 1 percent while the bottom 99 percent split the remaining 7 percent. This extraordinary unfairness is not only morally reprehensible, it is bad economics. It will be very difficult to create the jobs that our people need when so many Americans have little or no money to spend.”

"Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.

The cost of one modern heavy bomber is this:

  • a modern brick school in more than 30 cities.
  • It is two electric power plants, each serving a town of 60,000 population.
  • It is two fine, fully equipped hospitals. It is some 50 miles of concrete highway.
  • We pay for a single fighter plane with a half million bushels of wheat.
  • We pay for a single destroyer with new homes that could have housed more than 8,000 people.

This, I repeat, is the best way of life to be found on the road. the world has been taking.

This is not a way of life at all, in any true sense. Under the cloud of threatening war, it is humanity hanging from a cross of iron.

It calls upon them to answer the question that stirs the hearts of all sane men: is there no other way the world may live?

- President Dwight D. Eisenhower

minecanary:

U.S. Tax Dollars at War: 53 cents of every dollar Americans pay in taxes go to the military-industrial complex

ataxiwardance: Required viewing. 

Predators and Professors

"[T]he people who run these banks are encouraged to assume a lot of risky bets, which include pure gambling-type activities. The bankers get the upside when things go well, while the downside risks are largely someone else’s problem. This is a nontransparent, dangerous, government-run subsidy scheme, ultimately involving very large transfers from taxpayers to a few top people in the financial sector.

To protect the scheme’s continued existence, global megabanks contribute large amounts of money to politicians … [and] also run a highly sophisticated disinformation/propaganda operation, with the goal of creating at least a veneer of respectability for the subsidies that they receive. This is where universities come in.”

amodernmanifesto:

gingerche:

verbalresistance:

Spain’s ‘Indignants’ mark protest anniversary in their tens of thousands
Tens of thousands of protesters have gathered in Spanish cities to mark the first anniversary of the “Indignants” protest movement.
Pictured above: Protesters fill the streets; Youth unemployment in Spain stands at 50%, the highest of the 17 countries in the Eurozone [Via/More].
In central Madrid, protesters are still occupying Puerta del Sol square despite a midnight deadline to disperse.
The movement was formed out of anger at the impact of Spain’s deepest economic crisis in decades.
Unemployment hit a record high in April and the government has recently announced fresh austerity measures.
The turnout in Madrid was huge and would certainly have met organisers’ expectations, says Guy Hedgecoe, reporting for the BBC from Madrid.
Spanish authorities had said they wanted the protesters to disperse by midnight local time (22:00 GMT) but many thousands have defied the time limit.
“Today’s goal is to recover the public spaces,” protester Sofia Ruiz told Reuters.
“It is also a way to celebrate that we have been existing for one year and that we are going to be there until the system changes or we are listened to and they take into account our claims,” she added.
Last year the Indignants established a protest camp in Puerta del Sol, but the authorities have said they will prevent any protesters from staying overnight in the square.
There are some 2,000 riot police on duty but they have so far made no move to disperse the protesters.
At least 45,000 people also took to the streets in Barcelona, police said, although organisers put the attendance in the hundreds of thousands.
One protester there, Jose Helmandez, told the BBC he was a genetics and molecular biology doctor but had been unable to find a job in his field.
“A lot of people are leaving the country to find work, even if they end up not doing something they are qualified to do,” he said.
“I was living in France but returned to Spain almost two years ago, and all I can find are short-term jobs.” …
Read More: BBC News

Viva Indignados!

Viva la revolucion Espanol!
amodernmanifesto:

gingerche:

verbalresistance:

Spain’s ‘Indignants’ mark protest anniversary in their tens of thousands
Tens of thousands of protesters have gathered in Spanish cities to mark the first anniversary of the “Indignants” protest movement.
Pictured above: Protesters fill the streets; Youth unemployment in Spain stands at 50%, the highest of the 17 countries in the Eurozone [Via/More].
In central Madrid, protesters are still occupying Puerta del Sol square despite a midnight deadline to disperse.
The movement was formed out of anger at the impact of Spain’s deepest economic crisis in decades.
Unemployment hit a record high in April and the government has recently announced fresh austerity measures.
The turnout in Madrid was huge and would certainly have met organisers’ expectations, says Guy Hedgecoe, reporting for the BBC from Madrid.
Spanish authorities had said they wanted the protesters to disperse by midnight local time (22:00 GMT) but many thousands have defied the time limit.
“Today’s goal is to recover the public spaces,” protester Sofia Ruiz told Reuters.
“It is also a way to celebrate that we have been existing for one year and that we are going to be there until the system changes or we are listened to and they take into account our claims,” she added.
Last year the Indignants established a protest camp in Puerta del Sol, but the authorities have said they will prevent any protesters from staying overnight in the square.
There are some 2,000 riot police on duty but they have so far made no move to disperse the protesters.
At least 45,000 people also took to the streets in Barcelona, police said, although organisers put the attendance in the hundreds of thousands.
One protester there, Jose Helmandez, told the BBC he was a genetics and molecular biology doctor but had been unable to find a job in his field.
“A lot of people are leaving the country to find work, even if they end up not doing something they are qualified to do,” he said.
“I was living in France but returned to Spain almost two years ago, and all I can find are short-term jobs.” …
Read More: BBC News

Viva Indignados!

Viva la revolucion Espanol!
amodernmanifesto:

gingerche:

verbalresistance:

Spain’s ‘Indignants’ mark protest anniversary in their tens of thousands
Tens of thousands of protesters have gathered in Spanish cities to mark the first anniversary of the “Indignants” protest movement.
Pictured above: Protesters fill the streets; Youth unemployment in Spain stands at 50%, the highest of the 17 countries in the Eurozone [Via/More].
In central Madrid, protesters are still occupying Puerta del Sol square despite a midnight deadline to disperse.
The movement was formed out of anger at the impact of Spain’s deepest economic crisis in decades.
Unemployment hit a record high in April and the government has recently announced fresh austerity measures.
The turnout in Madrid was huge and would certainly have met organisers’ expectations, says Guy Hedgecoe, reporting for the BBC from Madrid.
Spanish authorities had said they wanted the protesters to disperse by midnight local time (22:00 GMT) but many thousands have defied the time limit.
“Today’s goal is to recover the public spaces,” protester Sofia Ruiz told Reuters.
“It is also a way to celebrate that we have been existing for one year and that we are going to be there until the system changes or we are listened to and they take into account our claims,” she added.
Last year the Indignants established a protest camp in Puerta del Sol, but the authorities have said they will prevent any protesters from staying overnight in the square.
There are some 2,000 riot police on duty but they have so far made no move to disperse the protesters.
At least 45,000 people also took to the streets in Barcelona, police said, although organisers put the attendance in the hundreds of thousands.
One protester there, Jose Helmandez, told the BBC he was a genetics and molecular biology doctor but had been unable to find a job in his field.
“A lot of people are leaving the country to find work, even if they end up not doing something they are qualified to do,” he said.
“I was living in France but returned to Spain almost two years ago, and all I can find are short-term jobs.” …
Read More: BBC News

Viva Indignados!

Viva la revolucion Espanol!

amodernmanifesto:

gingerche:

verbalresistance:

Spain’s ‘Indignants’ mark protest anniversary in their tens of thousands

Tens of thousands of protesters have gathered in Spanish cities to mark the first anniversary of the “Indignants” protest movement.

Pictured above: Protesters fill the streets; Youth unemployment in Spain stands at 50%, the highest of the 17 countries in the Eurozone [Via/More].

In central Madrid, protesters are still occupying Puerta del Sol square despite a midnight deadline to disperse.

The movement was formed out of anger at the impact of Spain’s deepest economic crisis in decades.

Unemployment hit a record high in April and the government has recently announced fresh austerity measures.

The turnout in Madrid was huge and would certainly have met organisers’ expectations, says Guy Hedgecoe, reporting for the BBC from Madrid.

Spanish authorities had said they wanted the protesters to disperse by midnight local time (22:00 GMT) but many thousands have defied the time limit.

“Today’s goal is to recover the public spaces,” protester Sofia Ruiz told Reuters.

“It is also a way to celebrate that we have been existing for one year and that we are going to be there until the system changes or we are listened to and they take into account our claims,” she added.

Last year the Indignants established a protest camp in Puerta del Sol, but the authorities have said they will prevent any protesters from staying overnight in the square.

There are some 2,000 riot police on duty but they have so far made no move to disperse the protesters.

At least 45,000 people also took to the streets in Barcelona, police said, although organisers put the attendance in the hundreds of thousands.

One protester there, Jose Helmandez, told the BBC he was a genetics and molecular biology doctor but had been unable to find a job in his field.

“A lot of people are leaving the country to find work, even if they end up not doing something they are qualified to do,” he said.

“I was living in France but returned to Spain almost two years ago, and all I can find are short-term jobs.” …

Read More: BBC News

Viva Indignados!

Viva la revolucion Espanol!

(via anarcho-queer)

comedycentral:

Colbert at the TIME 100

Of course, all of us should be honored to be listed on the TIME 100 alongside the two men who will be slugging it out in the fall:  President Obama, and the man who would defeat him, David Koch.

Give it up everybody.  David Koch.

Little known fact — David, nice to see you again, sir.

Little known fact, David’s brother Charles Koch is actually even more influential.  Charles pledged $40 million to defeat President Obama, David only $20 million.  That’s kind of cheap, Dave.

Sure, he’s all for buying the elections, but when the bill for democracy comes up, Dave’s always in the men’s room.  I’m sorry, I must have left Wisconsin in my other coat.

I was particularly excited to meet David Koch earlier tonight because I have a Super PAC, Colbert Super PAC, and I am — thank you, thank you — and I am happy to announce Mr. Koch has pledged $5 million to my Super PAC.  And the great thing is, thanks to federal election law, there’s no way for you to ever know whether that’s a joke.

By the way, if David Koch likes his waiter tonight, he will be your next congressman.

Colbert went totally Colbert on his fellow TIME 100 honorees the other night. Read the full speech here. You’ll be glad you did.

Jon Stewart / Stephen Colbert - still the most insightful mainstream political analysis on basic cable. 

Bitter the jest when satire comes too near truth and leaves a sharp sting behind it” - Tacitus.

(via socialuprooting)

Michigan’s Hostile Takeover

(Mother Jones) —By Paul Abowd | Wed Feb. 15, 2012 3:00 AM PST

"We haven’t seen anything this severe anywhere else in the country," says Charles Monaco, a spokesman for the Progressive States Network, a New York-based advocacy group. "There’s been nothing in other states where a budget measure overturns the democratic vote." Williams says emergency managers are able to enact draconian policies that would cost most city officials their jobs: "They couldn’t get elected if they tried.”


With an indefinite term and a city salary of $150,000, Schimmel doesn’t answer to anyone but the governor, at whose pleasure he serves. The city council can no longer make decisions but still calls meetings, which are routinely packed with angry residents. Asked by radio station WJR if the emergency-manager law hands power over to a “dictator,” Schimmel sighed, “I guess I’m the tyrant in Pontiac, then, if that’s the way it is.”

Pontiac is not Schimmel’s first clean-up job. In 2000, he was named the emergency manager of Hamtramck, where he served for six years. In 1986, a judge appointed him to oversee Ecorse’s finances after the city landed in state receivership; he stepped in and privatized city services. Today, the city is back in debt, and back under state management. Schimmel concedes that the privatization strategy can backfire, but he blames inept local government. “If you don’t have an overseer of the contractor, privatization can be much more expensive than in-house services,” he explains.

shortformblog:

    • $2 billion of DoD’s Iraq War spending unaccounted for (oops) source

    » Audit time! With the Iraq War’s chapter effectively closed, now’s apparently a good time to look back at all the money we spent there. There’s a problem, however: Of the $3 billion the Iraqi government set aside for the Department of Defense to use for reconstruction between 2004 and 2007, approximately two-thirds of that is unaccounted for. Worse, auditors can’t even find most of the documents: ”From July 2004 through December 2007, DoD should have provided 42 monthly reports,” an audit says. “However, it can locate only the first four reports.” Ever lose track of like $2 billion bucks? It’s fun, right?

    Read ShortFormBlog • Follow

India Factory Workers Revolt, Kill Company President

Forbes, 1/27/2012 @ 3:08PM

Workers at the Regency Ceramics factory in India raided the home of their boss, and beat him senseless with led pipes after a wage dispute turned ugly.

The workers were enraged enough to kill Regency’s president K. C. Chandrashekhar after their union leader, M. Murali Mohan, was killed by baton-wielding riot police on Thursday. The labor violence occurred in Yanam, a small city in Andra Pradesh state on India’s east coast. Police were called to the factory by management to quell a labor dispute. The workers had been calling for higher pay and reinstatement of previously laid off workers since October. Murali was fired a few hours after the police left the factory.

The next morning, at 06:00 on Friday, Murali went to the factory along with some workers and tried to obstruct the morning shift, local media reported. Long batons, known as lathis in India, were used by police who charged the workers, injuring at least 20 of them, including Murali. He died on the way to hospital, according to The Times of India. Hundreds of workers gathered outside the police station and demanded that officers be charged with homicide.

Curfew and other civil orders were imposed in Yanam because of the uprising that ultimately led to the murder of the Regency president. Police reported that rioters also torched several vehicles outside the police station. Eight Regency Ceramics workers were injured in police firing that followed; the condition of two of them is critical. More than 100 protesters have been arrested.

India factory workers are the lowest paid within the big four emerging markets. Per capita income in India is under $4,000 a year, making it the poorest country in the BRICs despite its relatively booming economy.

Did you know that some estimates put the number of Indian Naxalite-Maoist Communists as over 1,000,000. They are currently heavily concentrated in the impoverished Red Corrider and have, until recently, largely been a jungle / non-urban movement.