publius-esquire:

With the Hamilton Mix-Tape coming closer and closer to completion, it got me thinking, what other hip-hop albums could be made of America’s most metal Founder?

image

Federalist Frenzy Tracklist

  • Intro Track: Caribbean Spice: Bastard’s Paradise
  • Track 1: Bitches Love…

Alexander Hamilton's Important Papers Summarized

  • The Continentalist: This new government sucks.
  • The Federalist: Buy this Constitution now.
  • Report on Public Credit: We're broke.
  • Pacificus: You need an army and fleet to fight a war, guys.
  • Phocion: Why I hate Jefferson.
  • Report on Manufactures: You want economic independence from Britain? Make your own shit.
  • Camillus: I'm not kidding, we're not ready for war yet. Shut up about the Jay Treaty already.
  • Philo Camillus: Goddamn I'm awesome.
  • Reynolds Pamphlet: I'm not supplying this guy insider information, I'm just banging his wife. I have principles.
  • Adams Pamphlet: The president was mean.
  • The Examination: Why I /really/ hate Jefferson.
ladyhistory:

The captioned adventures of Ben Franklin.

"Stop breathin’ my pimp air, Hamilton." ladyhistory:

The captioned adventures of Ben Franklin.

"Stop breathin’ my pimp air, Hamilton." ladyhistory:

The captioned adventures of Ben Franklin.

"Stop breathin’ my pimp air, Hamilton." ladyhistory:

The captioned adventures of Ben Franklin.

"Stop breathin’ my pimp air, Hamilton."

ladyhistory:

The captioned adventures of Ben Franklin.

"Stop breathin’ my pimp air, Hamilton."

(via fuckyeahhistorycrushes)

The evolution of London: the city’s near-2,000 year history mapped

The historical development of London - from Roman times to today - presented by period of development using georeferenced road, statutorily protected buildings, and historical structures data.

Music: 

  • Diving Reflex - Breathe Underwater
  • Maserati - Cities
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

peashooter85:



OH MY GOd

I like this way too much.  fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

peashooter85:



OH MY GOd

I like this way too much. 
“I’ve only been Irish for twenty four hours. It’s a lot of fun!”
— Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Excerpted from his exceptional show African American Lives.
5feet12inches:

The New Yorker - December 16, 2013 cover
The cover is entitled, “Madiba,” Mandela’s tribal name, and is the artwork of author and artist Kadir Nelson. Nelson, who has illustrated a children’s book on Mandela, told the New Yorker that he drew this cover to reflect a young Mandela “during the time that he was on trial with over a hundred of his comrades.”
"I wanted to make a simple and bold statement about Mandela and his life as a freedom fighter," he said. "The raised fist and the simple, stark palette reminded me of posters and anti-apartheid imagery of the nineteen-eighties. This painting is a tribute to the struggle for freedom from all forms of discrimination, and Nelson’s very prominent role as a leader in the anti-apartheid movement.”

5feet12inches:

The New Yorker - December 16, 2013 cover

The cover is entitled, “Madiba,” Mandela’s tribal name, and is the artwork of author and artist Kadir Nelson. Nelson, who has illustrated a children’s book on Mandela, told the New Yorker that he drew this cover to reflect a young Mandela “during the time that he was on trial with over a hundred of his comrades.”

"I wanted to make a simple and bold statement about Mandela and his life as a freedom fighter," he said. "The raised fist and the simple, stark palette reminded me of posters and anti-apartheid imagery of the nineteen-eighties. This painting is a tribute to the struggle for freedom from all forms of discrimination, and Nelson’s very prominent role as a leader in the anti-apartheid movement.”

(via perpetualcollapse)

"Fear of serious injury cannot alone justify suppression of free speech and assembly. Men feared witches and burnt women. It is the function of speech to free men from the bondage of irrational fearsThose who won our independence by revolution were not cowards. They did not fear political change. They did not exalt order at the cost of liberty. To courageous, self-reliant men, with confidence in the power of free and fearless reasoning applied through the processes of popular government, no danger flowing from speech can be deemed clear and present, unless the incidence of the evil apprehended is so imminent that it may befall before there is opportunity for full discussion. If there be time to expose through discussion the falsehood and fallacies, to avert the evil by the processes of education, the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence.

- Whitney v. California, 274 U.S. 357, 376 (1927) (Brandeis, J., concurring).

Today is Justice Louis Brandeis’ 157th birthday. A Kentucky born Czech secular Jew and personal hero of mine. A man of prodigious intellect and beneficent spirit, the legal career of Louis Brandeis included stints as an academic social justice activist, a “People’s Lawyer” championing progressive causes, and, ultimately, Supreme Court Justice. 

Do yourself a favor and spend five minutes learning about this undeniably brilliant, passionate, and righteous jurist. You will discover a voice of the not-so-distant past which could do much to inform the discourse of the present.