crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
crookedinspiration:

fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  

I love this.
fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

peashooter85:



OH MY GOd

I like this way too much.  fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

peashooter85:



OH MY GOd

I like this way too much. 
“I’ve only been Irish for twenty four hours. It’s a lot of fun!”
— Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Excerpted from his exceptional show African American Lives.
5feet12inches:

The New Yorker - December 16, 2013 cover
The cover is entitled, “Madiba,” Mandela’s tribal name, and is the artwork of author and artist Kadir Nelson. Nelson, who has illustrated a children’s book on Mandela, told the New Yorker that he drew this cover to reflect a young Mandela “during the time that he was on trial with over a hundred of his comrades.”
"I wanted to make a simple and bold statement about Mandela and his life as a freedom fighter," he said. "The raised fist and the simple, stark palette reminded me of posters and anti-apartheid imagery of the nineteen-eighties. This painting is a tribute to the struggle for freedom from all forms of discrimination, and Nelson’s very prominent role as a leader in the anti-apartheid movement.”

5feet12inches:

The New Yorker - December 16, 2013 cover

The cover is entitled, “Madiba,” Mandela’s tribal name, and is the artwork of author and artist Kadir Nelson. Nelson, who has illustrated a children’s book on Mandela, told the New Yorker that he drew this cover to reflect a young Mandela “during the time that he was on trial with over a hundred of his comrades.”

"I wanted to make a simple and bold statement about Mandela and his life as a freedom fighter," he said. "The raised fist and the simple, stark palette reminded me of posters and anti-apartheid imagery of the nineteen-eighties. This painting is a tribute to the struggle for freedom from all forms of discrimination, and Nelson’s very prominent role as a leader in the anti-apartheid movement.”

(via perpetualcollapse)

"Fear of serious injury cannot alone justify suppression of free speech and assembly. Men feared witches and burnt women. It is the function of speech to free men from the bondage of irrational fearsThose who won our independence by revolution were not cowards. They did not fear political change. They did not exalt order at the cost of liberty. To courageous, self-reliant men, with confidence in the power of free and fearless reasoning applied through the processes of popular government, no danger flowing from speech can be deemed clear and present, unless the incidence of the evil apprehended is so imminent that it may befall before there is opportunity for full discussion. If there be time to expose through discussion the falsehood and fallacies, to avert the evil by the processes of education, the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence.

- Whitney v. California, 274 U.S. 357, 376 (1927) (Brandeis, J., concurring).

Today is Justice Louis Brandeis’ 157th birthday. A Kentucky born Czech secular Jew and personal hero of mine. A man of prodigious intellect and beneficent spirit, the legal career of Louis Brandeis included stints as an academic social justice activist, a “People’s Lawyer” championing progressive causes, and, ultimately, Supreme Court Justice. 

Do yourself a favor and spend five minutes learning about this undeniably brilliant, passionate, and righteous jurist. You will discover a voice of the not-so-distant past which could do much to inform the discourse of the present.

savage-america:

"But the real reason I had to chime in was that Steve Rogers is my favorite superhero. Why? Because unlike other patriotism-themed characters, Steve Rogers doesn’t represent a genericized America but rather a very specific time and place – 1930’s New York City. We know he was born July 4, 1920 (not kidding about the 4th of July) to a working-class family of Irish Catholic immigrants who lived in New York’s Lower East Side.[1] This biographical detail has political meaning: given the era he was born in and his class and religious/ethnic background, there is no way in hell Steve Rogers didn’t grow up as a Democrat, and a New Deal Democrat at that, complete with a picture of FDR on the wall.

Steve Rogers grew up poor in the Great Depression, the son of a single mother who insisted he stayed in school despite the trend of the time (his father died when he was a child; in some versions, his father is a brave WWI veteran, in others an alcoholic, either or both of which would be appropriate given what happened to WWI veterans in the Great Depression) and then orphaned in his late teens when his mother died of TB.[2] And he came of age in New York City at a time when the New Deal was in full swing, Fiorello LaGuardia was mayor, the American Labor Party was a major force in city politics, labor unions were on the move, the Abraham Lincoln Brigade was organizing to fight fascism in Spain in the name of the Popular Front, and a militant anti-racist movement was growing that equated segregation at home with Nazism abroad that will eventually feed into the “Double V” campaign.

Then he became a fine arts student. To be an artist in New York City in the 1930s was to be surrounded by the “Cultural Front.” We’re talking the WPA Arts and Theater Projects, Diego Rivera painting socialist murals in Rockefeller Center, Orson Welles turning Julius Caesar into an anti-fascist play and running an all-black Macbeth and “The Cradle Will Rock,” Paul Robeson was a major star, and so on. You couldn’t really be an artist and have escaped left-wing politics. And if a poor kid like Steve Rogers was going to college as a fine arts student, odds are very good that he was going to the City College of New York at a time when an 80% Jewish student body is organizing student trade unions, anti-fascist rallies, and the “New York Intellectuals” were busily debating Trotskyism vs. Stalinism vs. Norman Thomas Socialism vs. the New Deal in the dining halls and study carrels.”

Steven Attewell: Steve Rogers Isn’t Just Any Hero - Lawyers, Guns & Money

gotta love a well-researched takedown of such lazy, hoary tropes as “Captain America is a monolithic aryan crypto-fascist”

I sure think this is worth sharing with you folks.

Real talk: Captain America is one of my favorite superheroes.

Also, why yes I am wearing my shitty home-made Captain America shirt right now, thank you for asking.

petegans:

calumet412:

Birds eye view of Logan Square, 1927, Chicago.

via cityofchicago.org

My dear neighborhood!

Norwegian Memorial Lutheran Church and the Illinois Centinnel Monument, both standing proud! 

“God once had Bach and Michelangelo on his side, he had Mozart, and now who does he have? People with ginger whiskers and tinted spectacles who reduce the glories of theology to a kind of sharing, you know? That’s what religion has become, a feeble and anaemic nonsense, because we understood that the fire was within us, it was not in some idol on an altar, whether it was a gold cross or whether it was a Buddha or anything else, that we have it. The fault is in our stars, but [] the glory is [ours].”
Stephen Fry, the Blasphemy Debate with Christopher Hitchens