prostheticknowledge:

Submarine Cable Map 2014
A map put together by TeleGeography displays where all the undersea fibre-optic telecommunication cables are and who they connect to … in other words, a map of the physical internet:

The map depicts routes of 263 in-service and 22 planned undersea cables. Each country is colored according to how many international submarine cable system links are connected there. Capital cities and the location and direction of 44 cable vessels (as of December 6, 2013) are also provided.
The map provides detailed information about cable landing stations in key regions including Hawaii, Southern Florida, New York, New Jersey, Cornwall, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Sydney.

The map is available for purchase at TeleGeography. You can find out more about the map here
An interactive version of the map to view and zoom in your browser can be found here
An interview with TeleGeography’s research director about the subject can be found at CNN here
prostheticknowledge:

Submarine Cable Map 2014
A map put together by TeleGeography displays where all the undersea fibre-optic telecommunication cables are and who they connect to … in other words, a map of the physical internet:

The map depicts routes of 263 in-service and 22 planned undersea cables. Each country is colored according to how many international submarine cable system links are connected there. Capital cities and the location and direction of 44 cable vessels (as of December 6, 2013) are also provided.
The map provides detailed information about cable landing stations in key regions including Hawaii, Southern Florida, New York, New Jersey, Cornwall, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Sydney.

The map is available for purchase at TeleGeography. You can find out more about the map here
An interactive version of the map to view and zoom in your browser can be found here
An interview with TeleGeography’s research director about the subject can be found at CNN here
prostheticknowledge:

Submarine Cable Map 2014
A map put together by TeleGeography displays where all the undersea fibre-optic telecommunication cables are and who they connect to … in other words, a map of the physical internet:

The map depicts routes of 263 in-service and 22 planned undersea cables. Each country is colored according to how many international submarine cable system links are connected there. Capital cities and the location and direction of 44 cable vessels (as of December 6, 2013) are also provided.
The map provides detailed information about cable landing stations in key regions including Hawaii, Southern Florida, New York, New Jersey, Cornwall, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Sydney.

The map is available for purchase at TeleGeography. You can find out more about the map here
An interactive version of the map to view and zoom in your browser can be found here
An interview with TeleGeography’s research director about the subject can be found at CNN here

prostheticknowledge:

Submarine Cable Map 2014

A map put together by TeleGeography displays where all the undersea fibre-optic telecommunication cables are and who they connect to … in other words, a map of the physical internet:

The map depicts routes of 263 in-service and 22 planned undersea cables. Each country is colored according to how many international submarine cable system links are connected there. Capital cities and the location and direction of 44 cable vessels (as of December 6, 2013) are also provided.

The map provides detailed information about cable landing stations in key regions including Hawaii, Southern Florida, New York, New Jersey, Cornwall, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Sydney.

The map is available for purchase at TeleGeography. You can find out more about the map here

An interactive version of the map to view and zoom in your browser can be found here

An interview with TeleGeography’s research director about the subject can be found at CNN here

I’m still here: back online after a year without the internet

Really interesting essay by a fellow who, in the name of self-improvement, “left” the internet for a year. Read the whole article. His thoughts / commentary are insightful and somewhat counter-intuitive. 

"I wanted to figure out what the internet was "doing to me," so I could fight back. But the internet isn’t an individual pursuit, it’s something we do with each other. The internet is where people are." 

drawnblog:

Ever wonder just how these web comics kids make money? This snippet from the upcoming STRIPPED documentary explains it all, and it does it brilliantly with 8 bit animation.

I can’t tell you how much I’m looking forward to this doc. With interviews from Bill Watterson and Jim Davis to Ryan North and Kate Beaton they cover the gap between the old and new as the art form navigates this shift in how readers consume their media.

This is so cute/amusing/awesome!!!

Publishers are dead! Long live Publication! 

(via rickboven)

masterpieceinchaos:

Portlandia - Soft Opening
masterpieceinchaos:

Portlandia - Soft Opening

TimeWarner, an ISP who selectively rations content access to consumers, complains that NetFlix is selectively rationing content to ISPs. 

Does anyone else find “Nice Guys of OKCupid” and “Fedoras of OKCupid” rather unsettling?

“He who surfs for novelty should look to it that he himself does not become a novelty. For when you gaze long into the internet, the internet also gazes into you.”
—  - Aleksandr, Rebecca, and (yours truly) Scott.

rickboven:

So there’s this funny video circulating online of a guy in a bikini dancing to “Call Me Maybe” on Chatroulette. But The strangest part of the video is that, even though I’ve never met him in real life, I’m pretty positive the other guy in this pic is ATAXIWARDANCE. Greg, can you back me up on this?

Unfortunately is it not me!

However, given the inordinate amount of time I spend online, I would actually be strangely honored to claim the peculiar notoriety of being an incidental participant in a viral video. Sigh. Maybe next time something funny occurs online, I’ll be a part of it. If that ever happens again.  

Also, Mr. Boven, I just checked out your art work. You are supremely talented. Keep up the excellent work!

“We grew up with the Internet and on the Internet. This is what makes us different; this is what makes the crucial, although surprising from your point of view, difference: we do not ‘surf’ and the internet to us is not a ‘place’ or ‘virtual space’. The Internet to us is not something external to reality but a part of it: an invisible yet constantly present layer intertwined with the physical environment. We do not use the Internet, we live on the Internet and along it. If we were to tell our bildnungsroman to you, the analog, we could say there was a natural Internet aspect to every single experience that has shaped us. We made friends and enemies online, we prepared cribs for tests online, we planned parties and studying sessions online, we fell in love and broke up online. The Web to us is not a technology which we had to learn and which we managed to get a grip of. The Web is a process, happening continuously and continuously transforming before our eyes; with us and through us. Technologies appear and then dissolve in the peripheries, websites are built, they bloom and then pass away, but the Web continues, because we are the Web; we, communicating with one another in a way that comes naturally to us, more intense and more efficient than ever before in the history of mankind.”
fyeahhistorymajorheraldicbeast:

Combining two of the greatest things: History and booze. Unfortunately no one was as excited as I was when I pointed it out!
allons-y—ally

Dude. This guy gets me.

fyeahhistorymajorheraldicbeast:

Combining two of the greatest things: History and booze. Unfortunately no one was as excited as I was when I pointed it out!

allons-y—ally

Dude. This guy gets me.