“Alterius non sit qui suus esse potest.”
— "Let no man be another’s who can be his own." - Motto of Paracelsus, Swiss German Renaissance physician, botanist, alchemist, astrologer, and general occultist.
“I will not be the one to ignore criminality for the sake of political comfort. I would rather be without a state than without a voice.”

"Fear of serious injury cannot alone justify suppression of free speech and assembly. Men feared witches and burnt women. It is the function of speech to free men from the bondage of irrational fearsThose who won our independence by revolution were not cowards. They did not fear political change. They did not exalt order at the cost of liberty. To courageous, self-reliant men, with confidence in the power of free and fearless reasoning applied through the processes of popular government, no danger flowing from speech can be deemed clear and present, unless the incidence of the evil apprehended is so imminent that it may befall before there is opportunity for full discussion. If there be time to expose through discussion the falsehood and fallacies, to avert the evil by the processes of education, the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence.

- Whitney v. California, 274 U.S. 357, 376 (1927) (Brandeis, J., concurring).

Today is Justice Louis Brandeis’ 157th birthday. A Kentucky born Czech secular Jew and personal hero of mine. A man of prodigious intellect and beneficent spirit, the legal career of Louis Brandeis included stints as an academic social justice activist, a “People’s Lawyer” championing progressive causes, and, ultimately, Supreme Court Justice. 

Do yourself a favor and spend five minutes learning about this undeniably brilliant, passionate, and righteous jurist. You will discover a voice of the not-so-distant past which could do much to inform the discourse of the present.

“A man’s rights rest in three boxes. The ballot box, jury box and the cartridge box.”
— Frederick Douglass
“It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance.”
— Irish orator John Philpot Curran (1790)
“[T]his document helpfully underscored the critical point that is otherwise difficult to convey: when you endorse the application of a radical state power because the specific target happens to be someone you dislike and think deserves it, you’re necessarily institutionalizing that power in general. That’s why political leaders, when they want to seize extremist powers or abridge core liberties, always choose in the first instance to target the most marginalized figures: because they know many people will acquiesce not because they support that power in theory but because they hate the person targeted. But if you cheer when that power is first invoked based on that mentality - I’m glad Obama assassinated Awlaki without charges because he was a Bad Man! - then you lose the ability to object when the power is used in the future in ways you dislike (or by leaders you distrust), because you’ve let it become institutionalized.”

Glenn Greenwald - DOJ kill list memo forces many Dems out of the closet as overtly unprincipled hacks (via antigovernmentextremist)

Related: “[V]oters are enablers…

(via laliberty)

LTMC: Obama’s preservation of Bush-era expansions of excecutive power is a perfect example of this.  Things like signing statements, extra-governmental committees with the energy industry that we can’t access the minutes of, warrantless wiretapping, overclassification, all of it is still a problem under the Obama administration, and probably wouldn’t be if it wasn’t institutionalized under Bush.

(via letterstomycountry)

(via letterstomycountry)

“Relinquo vos liberos ab utroque homine // I leave you free from both men”
— The last words of Saint Marinus, founder of the world’s oldest surviving republic, San MarinoThis somewhat mysterious phrase is most likely to refer to the two “men” from whose oppressive power Saint Marinus had decided to separate himself, becoming a hermit on Mount Titano: respectively the Emperor and the Pope. This affirmation of freedom (first and foremost fiscal franchise) from both the Empire and the Papal States, however legendary, has always been the inspiration of the tiny republic of San Marino.
wereweever:

Alberto Casillas, the waiter who protected the 25S activists - Madrid, Spain.
“No one is getting in here, ‘cause this restaurant is packed with innocent people”, he yelled at the policemen.

CAMPEÒN wereweever:

Alberto Casillas, the waiter who protected the 25S activists - Madrid, Spain.
“No one is getting in here, ‘cause this restaurant is packed with innocent people”, he yelled at the policemen.

CAMPEÒN

wereweever:

Alberto Casillas, the waiter who protected the 25S activists - Madrid, Spain.

“No one is getting in here, ‘cause this restaurant is packed with innocent people”, he yelled at the policemen.

CAMPEÒN

(via realworldnews)

Hong Kong protests - in pictures 
THE GUARDIAN - Fifteen years after British colonial rule ended and China regained control of the city, tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets in the annual pro-democracy march. Protesters chanted slogans against new Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying just hours after he was sworn in. Hong Kong protests - in pictures 
THE GUARDIAN - Fifteen years after British colonial rule ended and China regained control of the city, tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets in the annual pro-democracy march. Protesters chanted slogans against new Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying just hours after he was sworn in. Hong Kong protests - in pictures 
THE GUARDIAN - Fifteen years after British colonial rule ended and China regained control of the city, tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets in the annual pro-democracy march. Protesters chanted slogans against new Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying just hours after he was sworn in. Hong Kong protests - in pictures 
THE GUARDIAN - Fifteen years after British colonial rule ended and China regained control of the city, tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets in the annual pro-democracy march. Protesters chanted slogans against new Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying just hours after he was sworn in.

Hong Kong protests - in pictures

THE GUARDIAN - Fifteen years after British colonial rule ended and China regained control of the city, tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets in the annual pro-democracy march. Protesters chanted slogans against new Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying just hours after he was sworn in.