anarchei:

EconPop: The Economics Of House Of Cards

EconStories:

In this episode of EconPop, Andrew discusses the Emmy award-winning Netflix original series House of Cards. Subjects include public choice theory, rent seeking, regulatory capture, and the incentives that drive political corruption.

See Also

“Feminism as a movement for political and social equity is important, but feminism as an academic clique committed to eccentric doctrines about human nature is not. Eliminating discrimination against women is important, but believing that women and men are born with indistinguishable minds is not. Freedom of choice is important, but ensuring that women make up exactly fifty percent of all professions is not. And eliminating sexual assaults is important, but advancing the theory that rapists are doing their part in a vast male conspiracy is not.”
— Steven Pinker, The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (via anarchei)

(via anarchei)

I’m still here: back online after a year without the internet

Really interesting essay by a fellow who, in the name of self-improvement, “left” the internet for a year. Read the whole article. His thoughts / commentary are insightful and somewhat counter-intuitive. 

"I wanted to figure out what the internet was "doing to me," so I could fight back. But the internet isn’t an individual pursuit, it’s something we do with each other. The internet is where people are." 


A Photo History of Male Affection
In my unending search for just the right vintage images for our articles, I have looked through thousands of photographs of men from the last century or so. One of the things that I have found most fascinating about many of these images, is the ease, familiarity, and intimacy, which men used to exhibit in photographs with their friends and compadres.
I shared a handful of these images in our very early post on the history of male friendship, but today I wanted to share almost 100 more in order to provide a more in-depth look into an important and highly interesting aspect of masculine history: the decline of male intimacy over the last century.
As you make your way through the photos below, many of you will undoubtedly feel a keen sense of surprise — some of you may even recoil a bit as you think, “Holy smokes! That’s so gay!”
The poses, facial expressions, and body language of the men below will strike the modern viewer as very gay indeed. But it is crucial to understand that you cannot view these photographs through the prism of our modern culture and current conception of homosexuality. The term “homosexuality” was in fact not coined until 1869, and before that time, the strict dichotomy between “gay” and “straight” did not yet exist. Attraction to, and sexual activity with other men was thought of as something you did, not something you were. It was a behavior — accepted by some cultures and considered sinful by others.
But at the turn of the 20th century, the idea of homosexuality shifted from a practice to a lifestyle and an identity. You did not have temptations towards a certain sin, you were ahomosexual person. Thinking of men as either “homosexual” or “heterosexual” became common. And this new category of identity was at the same time pathologized — decried by psychiatrists as a mental illness, by ministers as a perversion, and by politicians as something to be legislated against. As this new conception of homosexuality as a stigmatized and onerous identifier took root in American culture, men began to be much more careful to not send messages to other men, and to women, that they were gay. And this is the reason why, it is theorized, men have become less comfortable with showing affection towards each other over the last century. At the same time, it also may explain why in countries with a more conservative, religious culture, such as in Africa or the Middle East, where men do engage in homosexual acts, but still consider homosexuality the “crime that cannot be spoken,” it remains common for men to be affectionate with one another and comfortable with things like holding hands as they walk.
Whether the men below were gay in the way our current culture understands that idea, or in the way that they themselves understood it, is unknowable. What we do know is that the men would not have thought their poses and body language had anything at all to do with that question. What you see in the photographs was common, not rare; the photos are not about sexuality, but intimacy.
These photos showcase an evolution in the way men relate to one another — and the way in which certain forms and expressions of male intimacy have disappeared over the last century.
It has been said that a picture tells a thousand words, so while I have provided a little commentary below, I invite you to interpret the photos yourselves, and to ask and discuss questions such as: “Who were these men?” “What was the nature of their relationships?” “Why has male intimacy decreased and what are the repercussions for the emotional lives of men today?”

Excellent article. Invaluable topic and surprisingly well-written for a website that has a mustache in the title. 

A Photo History of Male Affection

In my unending search for just the right vintage images for our articles, I have looked through thousands of photographs of men from the last century or so. One of the things that I have found most fascinating about many of these images, is the easefamiliarity, and intimacy, which men used to exhibit in photographs with their friends and compadres.

I shared a handful of these images in our very early post on the history of male friendship, but today I wanted to share almost 100 more in order to provide a more in-depth look into an important and highly interesting aspect of masculine history: the decline of male intimacy over the last century.

As you make your way through the photos below, many of you will undoubtedly feel a keen sense of surprise — some of you may even recoil a bit as you think, “Holy smokes! That’s so gay!”

The poses, facial expressions, and body language of the men below will strike the modern viewer as very gay indeed. But it is crucial to understand that you cannot view these photographs through the prism of our modern culture and current conception of homosexuality. The term “homosexuality” was in fact not coined until 1869, and before that time, the strict dichotomy between “gay” and “straight” did not yet exist. Attraction to, and sexual activity with other men was thought of as something you did, not something you were. It was a behavior — accepted by some cultures and considered sinful by others.

But at the turn of the 20th century, the idea of homosexuality shifted from a practice to a lifestyle and an identity. You did not have temptations towards a certain sin, you were ahomosexual person. Thinking of men as either “homosexual” or “heterosexual” became common. And this new category of identity was at the same time pathologized — decried by psychiatrists as a mental illness, by ministers as a perversion, and by politicians as something to be legislated against. As this new conception of homosexuality as a stigmatized and onerous identifier took root in American culture, men began to be much more careful to not send messages to other men, and to women, that they were gay. And this is the reason why, it is theorized, men have become less comfortable with showing affection towards each other over the last century. At the same time, it also may explain why in countries with a more conservative, religious culture, such as in Africa or the Middle East, where men do engage in homosexual acts, but still consider homosexuality the “crime that cannot be spoken,” it remains common for men to be affectionate with one another and comfortable with things like holding hands as they walk.

Whether the men below were gay in the way our current culture understands that idea, or in the way that they themselves understood it, is unknowable. What we do know is that the men would not have thought their poses and body language had anything at all to do with that question. What you see in the photographs was common, not rare; the photos are not about sexuality, but intimacy.

These photos showcase an evolution in the way men relate to one another — and the way in which certain forms and expressions of male intimacy have disappeared over the last century.

It has been said that a picture tells a thousand words, so while I have provided a little commentary below, I invite you to interpret the photos yourselves, and to ask and discuss questions such as: “Who were these men?” “What was the nature of their relationships?” “Why has male intimacy decreased and what are the repercussions for the emotional lives of men today?”

Excellent article. Invaluable topic and surprisingly well-written for a website that has a mustache in the title. 

(via atomicyawn)

“I can calculate the movement of the stars, but not the madness of men.”
— Isaac Newton (1642 – 1727), who reportedly lost ₤20,000 investing in the tulip craze of the 17th century, about ₤2.4 million at present. 
“Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one.”
Charles Mackay (1812 – 1889)Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds 
“I must remind you that starving a child is violence. Suppressing a culture is violence. Neglecting school children is violence. Punishing a mother and her family is violence. Discrimination against a working man is violence. Ghetto housing is violence. Ignoring medical need is violence. Contempt for poverty is violence.”
—  Coretta Scott King (via theyoungradical)

(via theyoungradical)

theatlantic:

Why the ‘I Voted’ Sticker Matters

Get-Out-the-Vote campaigns are dogged about building social motivations for disinclined voters. Although low turnout should theoretically raise the value of each individual vote, research has shown that emphasizing high turnout is more likely to motivate marginal voters. Why? People care about the value of our vote. But, perhaps even more, we value being a part of a motivated group.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

shorterexcerpts:

thecsph:

ninja-suffragette:

Scotland really seems to be getting good at the whole ‘blame the perpetrator not the victim’ part of campaigning against rape (I’m reminded of this campaign which takes a similar tact). Which is far more than I can say for the English police force.
From the campaign website:

What can you do to help stop rape?





 1. Take responsibility … »
Find out about the law regarding rape and understand that no matter what the circumstances are, sex without consent is rape.
If there is any doubt about whether the person you’re with is consenting, don’t have sex.
2. Respect your sexual partner … »






Listen to the other person and treat them with respect – effective communication is key to healthy sexual relationships. It’s important to talk to your partner and listen to their wishes. Any kind of sexual act must be consensual – both partners should agree to it and be happy with it. 







3. Question your own attitudes … »





Consider the messages you hear about how men should act and think about your own actions, attitudes and behaviours. Understand that behaviour, such as pub chat about a woman ‘asking for it’ because of what she is wearing, can perpetuate harmful attitudes towards sexism and sexual violence. 
Work towards positively changing attitudes. Choose what kind of guy you want to be. 










4. Stand up for your beliefs … »






It’s easy to look the other way or keep quiet about your opinions. Don’t. Challenge attitudes that disturb you. For example, if a friend makes a joke about rape, tell them it’s not funny. More often than not you’ll find others share your opinion. 








5. Be proactive … »






If you’re with friends and become aware of a situation developing, don’t stay silent. For example where one or both parties are too drunk to have consensual sex, go and have a quiet word with your friend. It might feel awkward and difficult to intervene, but you are looking out for them in what could potentially be a risky situation. Also, if you see a similar situation arising outwith your group of friends, tell someone in authority, for example a bartender or door steward. 










6. Be supportive … »






If you know or suspect someone close to you has been abused or sexually assaulted, gently ask if you can help, offer them your support and encourage them to contact the police. There are also a range of support organisations which can help. 










7. Speak up … »






If you know someone is abusing their partner, don’t ignore it. If you feel able to do so, talk to them and urge them to seek help. There are many support organisations that can offer advice. You can report abuse by contacting your local police office or anonymously via Crimestoppers. In an emergency always dial 999. 










8. Get involved … »






Support the campaign.Display ‘we can stop it’ posters in your college, university or workplace – contact us for materials
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999)
Tell us why you support the campaign – we are always looking for fresh testimonials 
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999) Rape is a difficult subject to talk about but it’s only through raising awareness that attitudes will change. 
Sex without consent is rape. We can stop it.










Look at that. Not a ‘don’t drink too much’ or ‘be careful when you’re walking alone’ in sight.




More campaigns like this please.
[Via The F-Word]

An anti-rape campaign that doesn’t focus on victim blaming. A+, Scotland.

The roughly 50% percent of me that’s of Scottish heritage was very proud to see this.

When I was doing MAVAW work at UofM six year ago, this kind of “mainstream” messaging of male responsibility for stopping sexual violence was almost unheard of. Hard to imagine really. 
Funny how times change.  shorterexcerpts:

thecsph:

ninja-suffragette:

Scotland really seems to be getting good at the whole ‘blame the perpetrator not the victim’ part of campaigning against rape (I’m reminded of this campaign which takes a similar tact). Which is far more than I can say for the English police force.
From the campaign website:

What can you do to help stop rape?





 1. Take responsibility … »
Find out about the law regarding rape and understand that no matter what the circumstances are, sex without consent is rape.
If there is any doubt about whether the person you’re with is consenting, don’t have sex.
2. Respect your sexual partner … »






Listen to the other person and treat them with respect – effective communication is key to healthy sexual relationships. It’s important to talk to your partner and listen to their wishes. Any kind of sexual act must be consensual – both partners should agree to it and be happy with it. 







3. Question your own attitudes … »





Consider the messages you hear about how men should act and think about your own actions, attitudes and behaviours. Understand that behaviour, such as pub chat about a woman ‘asking for it’ because of what she is wearing, can perpetuate harmful attitudes towards sexism and sexual violence. 
Work towards positively changing attitudes. Choose what kind of guy you want to be. 










4. Stand up for your beliefs … »






It’s easy to look the other way or keep quiet about your opinions. Don’t. Challenge attitudes that disturb you. For example, if a friend makes a joke about rape, tell them it’s not funny. More often than not you’ll find others share your opinion. 








5. Be proactive … »






If you’re with friends and become aware of a situation developing, don’t stay silent. For example where one or both parties are too drunk to have consensual sex, go and have a quiet word with your friend. It might feel awkward and difficult to intervene, but you are looking out for them in what could potentially be a risky situation. Also, if you see a similar situation arising outwith your group of friends, tell someone in authority, for example a bartender or door steward. 










6. Be supportive … »






If you know or suspect someone close to you has been abused or sexually assaulted, gently ask if you can help, offer them your support and encourage them to contact the police. There are also a range of support organisations which can help. 










7. Speak up … »






If you know someone is abusing their partner, don’t ignore it. If you feel able to do so, talk to them and urge them to seek help. There are many support organisations that can offer advice. You can report abuse by contacting your local police office or anonymously via Crimestoppers. In an emergency always dial 999. 










8. Get involved … »






Support the campaign.Display ‘we can stop it’ posters in your college, university or workplace – contact us for materials
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999)
Tell us why you support the campaign – we are always looking for fresh testimonials 
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999) Rape is a difficult subject to talk about but it’s only through raising awareness that attitudes will change. 
Sex without consent is rape. We can stop it.










Look at that. Not a ‘don’t drink too much’ or ‘be careful when you’re walking alone’ in sight.




More campaigns like this please.
[Via The F-Word]

An anti-rape campaign that doesn’t focus on victim blaming. A+, Scotland.

The roughly 50% percent of me that’s of Scottish heritage was very proud to see this.

When I was doing MAVAW work at UofM six year ago, this kind of “mainstream” messaging of male responsibility for stopping sexual violence was almost unheard of. Hard to imagine really. 
Funny how times change.  shorterexcerpts:

thecsph:

ninja-suffragette:

Scotland really seems to be getting good at the whole ‘blame the perpetrator not the victim’ part of campaigning against rape (I’m reminded of this campaign which takes a similar tact). Which is far more than I can say for the English police force.
From the campaign website:

What can you do to help stop rape?





 1. Take responsibility … »
Find out about the law regarding rape and understand that no matter what the circumstances are, sex without consent is rape.
If there is any doubt about whether the person you’re with is consenting, don’t have sex.
2. Respect your sexual partner … »






Listen to the other person and treat them with respect – effective communication is key to healthy sexual relationships. It’s important to talk to your partner and listen to their wishes. Any kind of sexual act must be consensual – both partners should agree to it and be happy with it. 







3. Question your own attitudes … »





Consider the messages you hear about how men should act and think about your own actions, attitudes and behaviours. Understand that behaviour, such as pub chat about a woman ‘asking for it’ because of what she is wearing, can perpetuate harmful attitudes towards sexism and sexual violence. 
Work towards positively changing attitudes. Choose what kind of guy you want to be. 










4. Stand up for your beliefs … »






It’s easy to look the other way or keep quiet about your opinions. Don’t. Challenge attitudes that disturb you. For example, if a friend makes a joke about rape, tell them it’s not funny. More often than not you’ll find others share your opinion. 








5. Be proactive … »






If you’re with friends and become aware of a situation developing, don’t stay silent. For example where one or both parties are too drunk to have consensual sex, go and have a quiet word with your friend. It might feel awkward and difficult to intervene, but you are looking out for them in what could potentially be a risky situation. Also, if you see a similar situation arising outwith your group of friends, tell someone in authority, for example a bartender or door steward. 










6. Be supportive … »






If you know or suspect someone close to you has been abused or sexually assaulted, gently ask if you can help, offer them your support and encourage them to contact the police. There are also a range of support organisations which can help. 










7. Speak up … »






If you know someone is abusing their partner, don’t ignore it. If you feel able to do so, talk to them and urge them to seek help. There are many support organisations that can offer advice. You can report abuse by contacting your local police office or anonymously via Crimestoppers. In an emergency always dial 999. 










8. Get involved … »






Support the campaign.Display ‘we can stop it’ posters in your college, university or workplace – contact us for materials
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999)
Tell us why you support the campaign – we are always looking for fresh testimonials 
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999) Rape is a difficult subject to talk about but it’s only through raising awareness that attitudes will change. 
Sex without consent is rape. We can stop it.










Look at that. Not a ‘don’t drink too much’ or ‘be careful when you’re walking alone’ in sight.




More campaigns like this please.
[Via The F-Word]

An anti-rape campaign that doesn’t focus on victim blaming. A+, Scotland.

The roughly 50% percent of me that’s of Scottish heritage was very proud to see this.

When I was doing MAVAW work at UofM six year ago, this kind of “mainstream” messaging of male responsibility for stopping sexual violence was almost unheard of. Hard to imagine really. 
Funny how times change.  shorterexcerpts:

thecsph:

ninja-suffragette:

Scotland really seems to be getting good at the whole ‘blame the perpetrator not the victim’ part of campaigning against rape (I’m reminded of this campaign which takes a similar tact). Which is far more than I can say for the English police force.
From the campaign website:

What can you do to help stop rape?





 1. Take responsibility … »
Find out about the law regarding rape and understand that no matter what the circumstances are, sex without consent is rape.
If there is any doubt about whether the person you’re with is consenting, don’t have sex.
2. Respect your sexual partner … »






Listen to the other person and treat them with respect – effective communication is key to healthy sexual relationships. It’s important to talk to your partner and listen to their wishes. Any kind of sexual act must be consensual – both partners should agree to it and be happy with it. 







3. Question your own attitudes … »





Consider the messages you hear about how men should act and think about your own actions, attitudes and behaviours. Understand that behaviour, such as pub chat about a woman ‘asking for it’ because of what she is wearing, can perpetuate harmful attitudes towards sexism and sexual violence. 
Work towards positively changing attitudes. Choose what kind of guy you want to be. 










4. Stand up for your beliefs … »






It’s easy to look the other way or keep quiet about your opinions. Don’t. Challenge attitudes that disturb you. For example, if a friend makes a joke about rape, tell them it’s not funny. More often than not you’ll find others share your opinion. 








5. Be proactive … »






If you’re with friends and become aware of a situation developing, don’t stay silent. For example where one or both parties are too drunk to have consensual sex, go and have a quiet word with your friend. It might feel awkward and difficult to intervene, but you are looking out for them in what could potentially be a risky situation. Also, if you see a similar situation arising outwith your group of friends, tell someone in authority, for example a bartender or door steward. 










6. Be supportive … »






If you know or suspect someone close to you has been abused or sexually assaulted, gently ask if you can help, offer them your support and encourage them to contact the police. There are also a range of support organisations which can help. 










7. Speak up … »






If you know someone is abusing their partner, don’t ignore it. If you feel able to do so, talk to them and urge them to seek help. There are many support organisations that can offer advice. You can report abuse by contacting your local police office or anonymously via Crimestoppers. In an emergency always dial 999. 










8. Get involved … »






Support the campaign.Display ‘we can stop it’ posters in your college, university or workplace – contact us for materials
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999)
Tell us why you support the campaign – we are always looking for fresh testimonials 
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999) Rape is a difficult subject to talk about but it’s only through raising awareness that attitudes will change. 
Sex without consent is rape. We can stop it.










Look at that. Not a ‘don’t drink too much’ or ‘be careful when you’re walking alone’ in sight.




More campaigns like this please.
[Via The F-Word]

An anti-rape campaign that doesn’t focus on victim blaming. A+, Scotland.

The roughly 50% percent of me that’s of Scottish heritage was very proud to see this.

When I was doing MAVAW work at UofM six year ago, this kind of “mainstream” messaging of male responsibility for stopping sexual violence was almost unheard of. Hard to imagine really. 
Funny how times change.  shorterexcerpts:

thecsph:

ninja-suffragette:

Scotland really seems to be getting good at the whole ‘blame the perpetrator not the victim’ part of campaigning against rape (I’m reminded of this campaign which takes a similar tact). Which is far more than I can say for the English police force.
From the campaign website:

What can you do to help stop rape?





 1. Take responsibility … »
Find out about the law regarding rape and understand that no matter what the circumstances are, sex without consent is rape.
If there is any doubt about whether the person you’re with is consenting, don’t have sex.
2. Respect your sexual partner … »






Listen to the other person and treat them with respect – effective communication is key to healthy sexual relationships. It’s important to talk to your partner and listen to their wishes. Any kind of sexual act must be consensual – both partners should agree to it and be happy with it. 







3. Question your own attitudes … »





Consider the messages you hear about how men should act and think about your own actions, attitudes and behaviours. Understand that behaviour, such as pub chat about a woman ‘asking for it’ because of what she is wearing, can perpetuate harmful attitudes towards sexism and sexual violence. 
Work towards positively changing attitudes. Choose what kind of guy you want to be. 










4. Stand up for your beliefs … »






It’s easy to look the other way or keep quiet about your opinions. Don’t. Challenge attitudes that disturb you. For example, if a friend makes a joke about rape, tell them it’s not funny. More often than not you’ll find others share your opinion. 








5. Be proactive … »






If you’re with friends and become aware of a situation developing, don’t stay silent. For example where one or both parties are too drunk to have consensual sex, go and have a quiet word with your friend. It might feel awkward and difficult to intervene, but you are looking out for them in what could potentially be a risky situation. Also, if you see a similar situation arising outwith your group of friends, tell someone in authority, for example a bartender or door steward. 










6. Be supportive … »






If you know or suspect someone close to you has been abused or sexually assaulted, gently ask if you can help, offer them your support and encourage them to contact the police. There are also a range of support organisations which can help. 










7. Speak up … »






If you know someone is abusing their partner, don’t ignore it. If you feel able to do so, talk to them and urge them to seek help. There are many support organisations that can offer advice. You can report abuse by contacting your local police office or anonymously via Crimestoppers. In an emergency always dial 999. 










8. Get involved … »






Support the campaign.Display ‘we can stop it’ posters in your college, university or workplace – contact us for materials
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999)
Tell us why you support the campaign – we are always looking for fresh testimonials 
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999) Rape is a difficult subject to talk about but it’s only through raising awareness that attitudes will change. 
Sex without consent is rape. We can stop it.










Look at that. Not a ‘don’t drink too much’ or ‘be careful when you’re walking alone’ in sight.




More campaigns like this please.
[Via The F-Word]

An anti-rape campaign that doesn’t focus on victim blaming. A+, Scotland.

The roughly 50% percent of me that’s of Scottish heritage was very proud to see this.

When I was doing MAVAW work at UofM six year ago, this kind of “mainstream” messaging of male responsibility for stopping sexual violence was almost unheard of. Hard to imagine really. 
Funny how times change. 

shorterexcerpts:

thecsph:

ninja-suffragette:

Scotland really seems to be getting good at the whole ‘blame the perpetrator not the victim’ part of campaigning against rape (I’m reminded of this campaign which takes a similar tact). Which is far more than I can say for the English police force.

From the campaign website:

What can you do to help stop rape?
 1. Take responsibility … »
Find out about the law regarding rape and understand that no matter what the circumstances are, sex without consent is rape.
If there is any doubt about whether the person you’re with is consenting, don’t have sex.
2. Respect your sexual partner … »
Listen to the other person and treat them with respect – effective communication is key to healthy sexual relationships. It’s important to talk to your partner and listen to their wishes. 
Any kind of sexual act must be consensual – both partners should agree to it and be happy with it. 
3. Question your own attitudes … »
Consider the messages you hear about how men should act and think about your own actions, attitudes and behaviours. 
Understand that behaviour, such as pub chat about a woman ‘asking for it’ because of what she is wearing, can perpetuate harmful attitudes towards sexism and sexual violence. 
Work towards positively changing attitudes. Choose what kind of guy you want to be. 
4. Stand up for your beliefs … »
It’s easy to look the other way or keep quiet about your opinions. Don’t. Challenge attitudes that disturb you. For example, if a friend makes a joke about rape, tell them it’s not funny. More often than not you’ll find others share your opinion. 
5. Be proactive … »
If you’re with friends and become aware of a situation developing, don’t stay silent. For example where one or both parties are too drunk to have consensual sex, go and have a quiet word with your friend. It might feel awkward and difficult to intervene, but you are looking out for them in what could potentially be a risky situation. 
Also, if you see a similar situation arising outwith your group of friends, tell someone in authority, for example a bartender or door steward. 
6. Be supportive … »
If you know or suspect someone close to you has been abused or sexually assaulted, gently ask if you can help, offer them your support and encourage them to contact the police. There are also a range of support organisations which can help. 

7. Speak up … »
If you know someone is abusing their partner, don’t ignore it. If you feel able to do so, talk to them and urge them to seek help. There are many support organisations that can offer advice. 
You can report abuse by contacting your local police office or anonymously via Crimestoppers. In an emergency always dial 999. 
8. Get involved … »
Support the campaign.
Display ‘we can stop it’ posters in your college, university or workplace – contact us for materials
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999)
Tell us why you support the campaign – we are always looking for fresh testimonials 
info@wecanstopit.co.uk(This address is not for crime reporting - in an emergency always dial 999) Rape is a difficult subject to talk about but it’s only through raising awareness that attitudes will change. 
Sex without consent is rape. We can stop it.
Look at that. Not a ‘don’t drink too much’ or ‘be careful when you’re walking alone’ in sight.

More campaigns like this please.

[Via The F-Word]

An anti-rape campaign that doesn’t focus on victim blaming. A+, Scotland.

The roughly 50% percent of me that’s of Scottish heritage was very proud to see this.

When I was doing MAVAW work at UofM six year ago, this kind of “mainstream” messaging of male responsibility for stopping sexual violence was almost unheard of. Hard to imagine really. 

Funny how times change. 

President Obama and Mitt Romney have both recently described American households making $250,000 and less as being “middle income” or “middle class.”

This is incorrect. Objectively and categorically incorrect. Whether we define “middle” as average, moderate, or ordinary; this is a colossally wrong characterization of American household income. The United States median household income is $50,000 and only 4% of households make more than $250,000 annually. To clarify some potentially unfamiliar terms: (1) "median" simply means "midway point" between the richest and poorest American households; (2) “4%” means “not alot [sic] of people.” 

So. 

What is it about running for President that makes one willing to say such silly things? Why do you think these candidates routinely parade around this completely misleading fabrication of our economic reality?